СОР И СОЧ The English language Grade 10 (social-humanitarian direction)

30 август 2019, Пятница
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A collection of tasks for Formative Assessment
on the subject «The English language»
Grade 10
(social-humanitarian direction)
Nur-Sultan, 2019
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Dear teacher!
The group of teachers designed this collection of tasks as a teaching aid to assist teachers
within the framework of updating the content of education. Tasks with assessment criteria and
descriptors are samples for assisting teachers in providing constructive feedback to learners in terms
of achievement of learning objectives; in selecting and designing similar tasks, in planning lessons
and carrying out Formative Assessment.
The advisory nature of the tasks collection allows teachers to adapt, add and make changes
in tasks according to learners’ capacities and requirements.
Additional materials (manuals, presentations, plans, etc.), the discussion possibility on
forums and video instructions can be found on the official website of «Nazarbayev Intellectual
Schools» Autonomous Educational Organisation smk.edu.kz.
We wish you creative work and success!
This collection of tasks is designed for secondary school teachers, school administrations,
educational departments’ seniors, regional and school coordinators in criteria-based assessment and
others.
Freely available Internet resources such as pictures, cartoons, photos, texts, video and audio
materials, etc. have been used in designing this tasks collection. The collection of tasks was
designed for the noncommercial purposes.
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CONTENTS
TERM 1................................................................................................................................................ 4
Unit 1: Legend or Truth? .................................................................................................................. 4
Unit 2: Controversial Issues ........................................................................................................... 13
TERM 2.............................................................................................................................................. 19
Unit 3: Virtual Reality .................................................................................................................... 19
Unit 4: Out of this world. ............................................................................................................... 27
TERM 3.............................................................................................................................................. 36
Unit 5: Stress and Fear ................................................................................................................... 36
Unit 6: Imagination and Creativity ................................................................................................ 49
Unit 7. Reading for pleasure ......................................................................................................... 64
TERM 4.............................................................................................................................................. 68
Unit 8. Different ways of living ..................................................................................................... 68
Unit 9. Independent Project ............................................................................................................ 87
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TERM 1
Unit 1: Legend or Truth?
Subunit Analyzing and telling urban legends
Learning objectives 10.3.4 Evaluate and comment on the views of others in a
growing variety of talk contexts on a growing range of
general and curricular topics
10.3.1 Use formal and informal language registers in talk on a
wide range of general and curricular topics
10.3.7 Use appropriate subject-specific vocabulary and syntax
to talk about a range of general and curricular topics
10.4.1 Understand main points in extended texts on a wide
range of unfamiliar general and curricular topics
10.4.3 Skim a range of lengthy texts with speed to identify
content meriting closer reading on a wide range of
unfamiliar general and curricular topics
10.4.8 Use a wide range of familiar and unfamiliar paper and
digital reference resources to check meaning and extend
understanding
Assessment criteria  Evaluate and comments on other’s speech
 Separate formal and informal speech and apply the
differences in a talk
 Talk about given topics using appropriate syntax and
topic related vocabulary
 Analyse and find the main idea of a text
 Skim a text to identify content meriting closer reading
 Use a dictionary or other digital resources to understand
the meaning of a word and expand vocabulary
Level of thinking skills Knowledge and comprehension
Application
Higher order thinking skills
Task 1:
Learners first scan and skim the text quickly and say what the text is about, who the main
characters are and what the main conflict of the story is about.
Work in pairs. Read the text quickly and identify the following:
- main idea of the text
- main characters
- main conflict
The Legend of Medusa (Greek mythology)
1. Polydectes, an evil king of the island of Seriphos, fell madly in love with a beautiful
woman named Danae. He wanted to marry her, but wanted nothing to do with her adult son,
Perseus. Hoping to get rid of Perseus, Polydectes ruthlessly tricked the young man into brashly
undertaking a deadly mission - to bring him the head of a dreaded monster called Medusa.
2. Medusa was one of three fearsome Gorgon sisters who lived far away in a secret hiding
place. The sisters had brass claws, golden wings, boars' tusks, and masses of hissing snakes for
hair. Anyone who looked into their frightful faces instantly turned into stone.
3. Fortunately, the gods Athena and Hermes, as well as three nymphs, offered to help
Perseus. Athena gave him a shiny bronze shield and Hermes gave him a sword that could not be
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bent by the Gorgons' scales. The nymphs gave Perseus winged shoes so that he could fly, a cap
that made him invisible, and a pouch in which to carry the Gorgon's head.
4. Perseus flew first to the home of the aged ones. These three women, who were sisters to
the Gorgons, were born with gray hair and shared a single eye and a tooth between them.
Wearing his cap of invisibility, Perseus snatched the eye as one sister passed it to another.
Threatening to keep the eye, Perseus coerced them into revealing the Gorgon's secret hiding
place.
5. Perseus arrived at the cave of the Gorgons, where, by good fortune, they were all asleep.
In order to see Medusa without turning to stone, Perseus located her grotesque face in a
reflection on his shiny shield. He swiftly cut off her head, dropped it into his bag, and fled from
Medusa's angry sisters. When Perseus returned to Seriphos, the evil Polydectes laughed at him
and asked what was in his sack. Perseus pulled out the horrifying head of Medusa and turned
Polydectes to stone.
6. Medusa's severed head retained its power to turn people into stone, so Perseus carried it
on many adventures, using it to defeat his enemies. Eventually, in gratitude for her protection,
Perseus gave Medusa's head to Athena, who placed it on her breastplate to ward off evil.
Task 2: To activate learner’s schemata, ask them to give examples on each category.
While-reading: Vocabulary Extension.
Work with the dictionary and group the words in bold into categories.
Adjectives: ___________________________________________
Verbs: ______________________________________________
Nouns: ______________________________________________
Collocations _________________________________________
Task 3:
Post-reading: Text analysis Match the headings with paragraphs 1-6:
* Final victory
* Who helped the hero
* Problem
* Resolution
* Beginning of hero’s deed
* Character’s description
Task 4:
Discussion. Answer the questions. Express your opinion. Agree or disagree with your peers:
1) Do you know any other legends and myths? Give examples and details.
2) Can you give any examples of Kazakh legends? Give examples and details.
3) Do you know any Kazakh mythological creatures? Can you describe them?
Answer Keys:
Task 2
Adjectives: evil, brashly, dreaded, grotesque, horrifying, severed
Verbs: to flee (fled), to coerce, to snatch, to threaten, to hiss
Nouns: claws, tusks, nymphs, shield, sword, pouch
Collocations: winged shoes, to share a single eye and a tooth, by good fortune, in gratitude for
something
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Task 3
1) Problem
2) Character’s description
3) Who helped the hero
4) Beginning of hero’s deed
5) Final victory
6) Resolution
Descriptor A learner
Task 1  says what the text is about;
 says who the main characters are;
 says what the main conflict of the story is;
Task 2  groups words in appropriate categories (parts of speech);
Task 3  matches headings and paragraphs;
Task 4  speaks about different legends and myths around the world;
 uses appropriate subject specific vocabulary;
 applies formal and informal language in speech.
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Unit 1: Legend or Truth?
Subunit Analyzing and telling urban legends
Learning objectives 10.2.2 Understand specific information in unsupported
extended talk on a wide range of general and curricular
topics, including talk on a limited range of unfamiliar
topics
Assessment criteria  Identify specific information in extended talks
Level of thinking skills Knowledge and comprehension
Task. Listen to the stories and fill in the gaps. Write NO MORE THAN TWO WORDS.
Teacher reads the transcript.
The dead kangaroo story.
1. In 1987 the world’s best sailors ____________________________ in the America’s
Cup yacht race off the coast of Fremantle.
2. One day, one of the sailors went for a drive in the outback and accidentally
____________________________ a kangaroo.
3. While the sailor was taking ____________________________ , the kangaroo came
round.
The falling cow story.
4. Eventually, the pilot of a ____________________________ plane told the police what
had happened.
5. Before they ____________________________ from their Siberian airbase, the plane’s
crew had stolen some cows from a nearby field.
6. While they were flying at 25,000 feet, one cow broke free and started
____________________________ inside the plane.
Answer keys
1. were competing
2. ran over
3. some photos
4. Russian transport
5. took off
6. running around
Transcript
The dead kangaroo story
In 1987 the world’s best sailors were competing in the American’s Cup yacht race off the
coast of Fremantle, in Western Australia.
One day, one of the sailors went for a drive in the outback and accidentally ran over a
kangaroo. The sailor got out and leaned the dead kangaroo against the side of the car. Then he
decided to put his American’s Cup team jacket on the animal and take a few pictures to show his
friends. However, it turned out that the accident hadn’t killed the animal, it had only knocked it
out. While the sailor was taking some photos, the kangaroo came round. Realizing that
something was wrong, the animal immediately ran away – taking the sailor’s jacket, his passport,
three credit cards and $1,000 in cash with it.
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The falling cow story
In 1997 the crew of a Japanese fishing boat were rescued after their boat had sunk in very
unusual circumstances. According to the fishermen, the boat had been sailing in calm waters
when a cow fell from the sky and crashed through the boat. Unfortunately, the police thought the
crew had made the whole story up and arrested them. They remained in prison while the police
tried to work out why the boat had sunk. Eventually, the pilot of a Russian transport plane told
the police what had happened. Before they took off from their Siberian airbase, the plane’s crew
had stolen some cows from a nearby field. While they were flying at 25,000 feet, one cow broke
free and started running around inside the plane. The crew managed to push it out of the door
and into the sea – or so they thought.
Resource: Millenium, Grade 11, Unit 4.
Descriptor A learner
 completes the gaps with the correct word(s);
 spells the words correctly.
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Unit 1: Legend or Truth?
Subunit Analyzing and telling urban legends
Learning objectives 10.1.6 Organize and present information clearly to others
10.5.1 Plan, write, edit and proofread work at text level
independently on a range of general and curricular topics
10.5.2 Use a growing range of vocabulary, which is appropriate
to topic and genre, and which is spelt accurately
10.6.13 Use a growing variety of past modal forms including
must have, can have, might have to express speculation
and deduction about the past on a wide range of familiar
general and curricular topics
Assessment criteria  Form and present ideas/information effectively and
demonstrate the ability to express it
 Plan, write, edit, make corrections and write a final draft
 Use topic related vocabulary in writing and spell it
correctly
 Distinguish the difference in the usage of modal verbs
for different functions (obligation, necessity, possibility,
permission, requests, suggestions, prohibition) and use it
in past tenses
Level of thinking skills Application
Task 1. In pairs or small groups, discuss the following questions:
- Do you know any Kazakh mythological creatures?
- Have you ever heard of Zhestyrnak?
Learners are given a short text about Zhestyrnak which they have to read, write down the main
idea into their copy-books and then make notes on the main points.
Then they should tell about the following using their notes:
 appearance
 eating habits
 family
Zhestyrnak
Zhestyrnak is a female evil demonic character of the Kazakh mythology. It usually
appears as a beautiful young girl power.
Zhestyrnak, in addition to her monstrous power, has a loud, piercing voice and kills birds
and small animals with her own cry. She is a beauty with vampire nature. But unlike the
European evil spirits Zhestyrnak is not afraid of silver - her clothes are full of gold and silver
ornaments. Her hands end with long or woman with a copper nose and copper claws, possessing
an evil character and incredible metal claws, which she never shows - hides them under long
sleeves. Zhestyrnak hypnotizes a person with a cold, unblinking gaze, and when he falls
asleep, she bites into him with her iron claws, sucking out all the blood. These creatures are
incredibly dark-minded and revengeful. If Zhestyrnak is killed, then her husband, the Sorel,
begins to take revenge for her.
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Then learners discuss the structure of a legend and the purpose of each paragraph together (in
small groups or as a whole class).
Structure:
1) exposition (protagonist-antagonist, setting (time & place), conflict/problem
(internal/external));
2) rising actions
3) climax
4) falling actions
5) resolution
Task 2. Now you are going to write your own story about a mythological creature. First, make a
plan of your own story according to the structure.
Descriptors for the plan (learners have them in their structures already):
1. Name of the story
2. Characters' names
3. Place
4. Time
5. Problem
6. 2 events or more in rising action
7. Climax
8. Falling action(s)
9. Resolution
Task 3. Now start writing your story.
Assessment criteria:
• Follow the structure of a short story
• Include a mythological creature as one of the characters in your story
• Have at least two events in rising action
• Write at least 2 sentences using modal verbs of speculation and deduction
Descriptor A learner
Task 1  describes Zhestyrnak (a Kazakh mythological creature);
Task 2  creates a plan for their own story in accordance with the structure;
Task 3  follows the structure of a short story when writing;
 includes a mythological creature as one of the characters in their
stories;
 has at least two events in rising action;
 writes at least 2 sentences using modal verbs of speculation and
deduction correctly.
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Unit 1: Legend or Truth?
Subunit Writing an article
Learning objectives 10.1.10 Use talk or writing as a means of reflecting on and
exploring a range of perspectives on the world
10.5.4 Use style and register to achieve appropriate degree of
formality in a growing variety of written genres on a
range of general and curricular topics
10.5.6 Write coherently at text level using a variety of
connectors on a range of familiar general and curricular
topics
10.5.7 Use independently appropriate layout at text level on a
range of general and curricular topics
10.6.9 Use appropriately a wide variety of active and passive
simple present and past forms and past perfect simple
forms in narrative and reported speech on a wide range
of familiar general and curricular topics
Assessment criteria  Consider different perspectives on the world orally or in
a written form
 Determine and use the appropriate style and register in
writing
 Organize sentences, paragraphs and ideas logically using
a variety of linking devices
 Use an appropriate layout in writing
 Differentiate between active and passive forms and use
active and passive simple present and past forms and past
perfect simple forms in narrative and reported speech
Level of thinking skills Application
Higher order thinking skills
Task. Write an article on one of the topics:
1) How the Great Myths and Legends Were Created
2) Urban Legends: How They Start and Why They Live Among People
Writing Criteria:
- Article has a thesis that describes the content.
- Topic sentence grabs the reader’s attention and focuses the reader on the main idea of a
paragraph.
- The details in the article are clear and supportive of the topic.
- A variety of linking words are used.
- New vocabulary is used.
- Correct spelling and grammar (present, past and past perfect active and passive forms)
(no more than 2 minor mistakes)
Descriptor A learner
Task  writes a thesis that describes the content;
 writes a topic sentence which grabs attention and focuses on the
main idea;
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 uses details which clearly support the topic;
 uses a variety of linking words;
 uses new vocabulary;
 uses correct spelling and grammar.
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Unit 2: Controversial Issues
Subunit Discussing pros and cons of immigration
Learning objectives 10.4.5 Deduce meaning from context in extended texts on a
wide range of familiar general and curricular topics, and
some unfamiliar topics
10.4.9 Recognize inconsistencies in argument in extended texts
on a wide range of general and curricular topics
Assessment criteria  Identify the meaning and details of the reading texts on
familiar topics and draw conclusion by reasoning
 Find claim, reasons and evidence in the text to recognise
inconsistencies in argument
Level of thinking skills Knowledge and comprehension
Task 1. Read the text and match the words highlighted in the text with their meanings. There are
two extra meanings which you will not use.
1. skip a. busy
2. currently b. present
3. enchanted c. miss out
4. enticing d. unwillingly
5. on the go e. attractive
6. issue f. give something officially
g. cancel
h. delighted
Text: One-Way Ticket
A.
Jane Markham used to work for the Department for Education in England, tracking down
truants, children who skip school on a regular basis, and trying to convince them to go back.
‘There came a point in my life when I really needed a change’. So she packed her bags, grabbed
her friend Pauline and headed for Spain. ‘The two of us had been there the previous summer and
we really liked the sunny warmth. Plus, we knew it would be extremely easy to get a job;
English teachers were in demand. We planned on staying for a couple of years, just to experience
something different.’ Jane and Pauline then rented a flat and got a job at an English language
school. Meeting someone was not a long way away. Jane married Pablo, a restaurant owner, and
they now have four kids. ‘I’ve been living here for 25 years and Spain is my home now. The
only thing I miss is the scenery, the English countryside, how you can just walk out your front
door and in less than 15 minutes be in a park or green field. But life here is good. I love it.’
B.
Neil Bremer and his wife, Barbara, are a retired couple currently living in Morocco. Their
experience proves it’s never too late to go after the things that make you happy in life. ‘Our kids
paid for us to have a holiday in North Africa on the occasion of our 40
th
wedding anniversary. It
was the first time we had left the country. We travelled from Morocco to Algeria, Tunisia, and
Egypt and we were absolutely amazed. The sights, the smells, the scenery, it was all new and
exciting, a completely different world.’ The couple were so enchanted that they kept putting off
the date of their departure back home, until a year passed without them noticing. It became
apparent they weren’t going to leave anytime soon. They have now settled in happily in their
new house in Egypt, where their kids visit them every summer. ‘Our pension money lasts so
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much longer here; we live very comfortably. And we love the people here. We have made many
new friends’.
C.
Jason Firth had just finished university when he went on a working holiday in Dubai, at an
architectural company. ‘The city is full of construction activities; they are building new luxury
flats, hotels and company headquarters on every corner.’ The firm needed architects for that
summer to carry out the work. Jason found the opportunity highly enticing, although it was so
far away from his homes in Wales. The company found him to be hard-working, imaginative and
practical, and so when his term was coming to an end, they offered him a permanent position.
‘Saying yes was the best thing I could have done. The amount of work needed to be done always
keeps you on the go, always trying to do better, and I love feeling of accomplishment. Plus, the
money is great. If I ever decide to go back, I know I will have secured my economic future’.
D.
Leon Alvarez had no idea how his life would change as he set off for his holiday from Spain to
Argentina with his two best friends. All was going well until Leon’s passport and other
documents got stolen. ‘It was a horrible feeling at first. This sense of helplessness makes you
feel completely lost.’ The authorities did the best they could to issue a new passport, but it took a
long time and Leon was told he would have to stay in the country for a couple of mo nths. In an
unexpected gesture of self-sacrifice, his two friends offered to stay with him, instead of going
back to Spain and their normal lives. ‘I turned from helpless to crazy enthusiastic. We tried to
make the most of this unfortunate event and decided to look for a job to help with our living
costs. We were all cooks in Spain and, fortunately, a restaurant owner took all three of us on a
full-time salary.’ The three friends ended up enjoying learning the new cuisine and introducing
elements of Spanish cooking into the menu. ‘By the time my passport was ready, we agreed we
liked working together and opened our own restaurant in Buenos Aires’.
Task 2. Read the texts again. For statements 1-10, put T if the statement is true or F if the
statement is false.
1) Neil and Barbara mention that they had never travelled abroad before. _________
2) Jason stayed in the country because of a negative effect. _________
3) Jane enjoys the natural beauty of her home country. _________
4) Leon talks about returning to his home country. ____________
5) Neil and Barbara set up a business in the country they moved to. _____________
6) Jane had a different job back home. __________
7) Jason didn’t stay in the country as an extension to his holiday. ____________
8) Jane doesn’t have to work. ___________
9) Leon experienced a radical change in his attitude? _______________
10) Neil and Barbara spend less money than they would in their home country. __________
Answer Keys:
Task 1: 1.c; 2.b; 3.h; 4.e; 5.a; 6.f
Task 2: 1. T; 2. F; 3. T; 4. F; 5. F; 6. T; 7. T; 8. F; 9. T; 10. T
Descriptor A learner
Task 1  correctly matches the words with their meanings;
Task 2  recognizes correct and incorrect statements.
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Unit 2: Controversial Issues
Subunit Discussing pros and cons of immigration
Learning objectives 10.2.2 Understand specific information in unsupported extended
talk on a wide range of general and curricular topics,
including talk on a limited range of unfamiliar topics
10.6.3 Use a variety of compound adjectives, adjectives as
participles, comparative structures indicating degree, and
intensifying adjectives on a wide range of familiar general
and curricular topics
Assessment criteria  Identify specific information in extended talks
 Demonstrate the ability to use compound adjectives and
adjectives as participles
Level of thinking skills Knowledge and Comprehension
Task 1. Listen or watch a video about a school in Cardiff, the capital of Wales, and match the two
sentence halves and write a – f next to the number 1 – 6.
Follow: http://learnenglishteens.britishcouncil.org/uk-now/video-uk/multicultural-britain
1. Sunny a. is from Kenya.
2. Sunny’s father b. was born in London.
3. Avinda c. came from Zambia.
4. St. Mary’s School d. went to Cardiff because he was offered a job there.
5. Mercy, Joy and Derek e. was involved with a project that helps migrants.
6. Derek f. didn’t have a job when he arrived in the UK.
Task 2: Post-Listening
Read the questions and write down your answers. Try to use different forms of adjectives (degrees
of comparison).
- How multicultural is your school and your town?
- How many different languages do students at your school speak?
- Do you speak different languages at home and at school?
- What reasons can you think of for going to live in a new country?
- What difficulties do you think a migrant family would face?
Transcript
This is Southall Broadway in West London. This area has one of the largest Asian populations
in London. The United Kingdom is an ethnically diverse country with many different communities
that reflects the multicultural nature of Britain. Many British people’s families originally come from
overseas. Over the centuries, people from around the world have come to live here.
The first significant wave of immigrants arrived by ship from Jamaica in 1948. The Notting
Hill Carnival celebrates this Caribbean culture.
In the 1950s and 60s, Indian, Bangladeshi and Pakistani families made Britain their home.
Asian Ugandan refugees fled here in the 1970s. Followed by Somalis in the 90s. And in recent
years, Eastern European citizens have arrived in search of work.
This cultural variety makes Britain a vibrant place to be, but it’s not without its problems.
Conflicts can arise between cultures and generations. Young people whose parents or grandparents
settled here have a very different experience of growing up to their parents.
Sunny Grewel and his father Avinda live in Southall. Avinda came here from Kenya in the
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70s. Sunny was born here.
Nick: Avinda, what was life like when you first came here?
Avinda: It was hard. There was no jobs for, for people like us.
Nick: And what’s life like now, for young people, Sunny?
Sunny: I think we’re very much a part of the communities and government and everything, so it’s a
lot more equal for everyone.
Nick: What are the main arguments between the younger and older generations?
Avinda: When they were small, I wouldn’t let him wear these earrings and have a long ponytail.
They have to look smart.
Nick: And what’s the best thing about living here, Sunny?
Sunny: The food, the different cultures that come in and bring their spices, their experiences and
even their rituals, so you get a taste of the world within this small community.
In the past, differences between communities have led to violence. But new community-based
projects have brought different generations and cultures together.
Here at St Mary’s School in Cardiff in Wales, more than 20 languages are spoken. It’s one of
the most multicultural schools in Wales. The school was involved with a project called 'Open
Cities'. It helps migrants, people from other countries, become part of the community. The
schoolchildren took pictures of people and places to show what it's like to live in Cardiff.
Some of the kids are featured in an exhibition called Open Cities Faces.
Mercy and Joy and their father Derek are originally from Zambia. They have lived here for
six years.
Nick: Derek, tell me why you came to Cardiff and why you took part in this project.
Derek: I am an Engineering Consultant. I came to Cardiff because I was offered a job here. This
project was a good thing because it was trying to show something positive about migration and
integration.
Nick: Why is Mercy photographed by a window?
Derek: Because the photographer wanted to find a way to show the hopes for our future – the better
life that we look towards.
Nick: But there’s a lot of shadow in that photograph, as well.
Derek: Yes, the shadow is deliberate to try to show our past, where we’ve come from.
Nick: And do you consider Cardiff to be your home now?
Derek: Yes. We are part of the local community, we have settled down and we think Cardiff is
great.
Projects like ‘Open Cities’ can bring people in the community together and give young people
hope for the future.
Descriptor A learner
Task 1  matches the two sentence parts together;
Task 2  answers the questions, using a variety of different adjective forms.
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Unit 2: Controversial Issues
Subunit Expressing opinions about equality issues
Learning objectives 10.5.3 Write with grammatical accuracy on a range of familiar
general and curricular topics
10.6.12 Use a variety of comparative degree adverb structures
with regular and irregular adverbs; use a wide variety of
pre-verbal, post-verbal, and end-position adverbs on a
wide range of familiar general and curricular topics
10.6.14 Use a variety of prepositional phrases before nouns and
adjectives; use a number of dependent prepositions m
following nouns and adjectives and a variety of
prepositions following verbs on a wide range of familiar
general and curricular topics
Assessment criteria  Apply grammar rules in writing
 Use comparative degree adverb structures (not as…as)
and an increased variety of pre-verbal, post-verbal and
end-position adverbs
 Use prepositions as, like correctly to indicate manner.
Apply the rule for the usage of dependent prepositions
following adjectives
Level of thinking skills Application
Task 1. Listen a video. What do you think what issues are raised in the video? Support your
ideas with reasons and examples from the video. Discuss your ideas in a class.
Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XlcaDhRu1AQ
Task 2. Complete the chart below:
Gender differences Gender similarities
1.
2.

1.
2.

Task 3. Summarize your ideas and write a short paragraph based on the completed chart.
Use:
- comparative degree adverb structures (not as…as) and variety of adverbs such as often,
just, quite, completely, last (time), however, a s a result
- prepositions as, like correctly to indicate manner and adjectives and nouns such as
satisfied with, relevant to, different from, enthusiastic about, comparison between,
preference for, connection between.
Descriptor A learner
Task 1  expresses opinion about the topic;
 supports ideas by giving reasons and examples;
Task 2  completes the chart;
Task 3  summarizes ideas in writing;
 uses comparative degree adverb structures (not as…as) and variety
of adverbs such as often, just, quite, completely, last (time),
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however, a s a result
 prepositions as, like correctly to indicate manner and adjectives and
nouns such as satisfied with, relevant to, different from, enthusiastic
about, comparison between, preference for, connection between.
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TERM 2
Unit 3: Virtual Reality
Subunit Creating and explaining a fantasy country (geography, laws,
economy, industry)
Learning objectives 10.3.5 Interact with peers to make hypotheses about a wide
range of general and curricular topics
10.3.7 Use appropriate subject-specific vocabulary and syntax
to talk about a range of general and curricular topics
10.4.1 Understand main points in extended texts on a wide
range of familiar and some unfamiliar general and
curricular topics
10.4.2 Understand specific information and detail in extended
texts on a range of familiar general and curricular topics,
and some unfamiliar topics
Assessment criteria  Interact with peers to make hypotheses
 Discuss the topic with peers, agree or disagree on it and
make conclusions to fulfil the task
 Talk about given topics using appropriate syntax and
topic related vocabulary
 Analyse and find the main idea of a text
 Identify and analyse text structure to find specific/certain
information
Level of thinking skills Knowledge and Comprehension
Application
Higher order thinking skills
Pre-Reading:
Tell learners they are going to read about a man who tried to start his own country. Pre-teach
independent state, constitution, interest rates, mugging, hugging, and democracy.
Task 1. Skim the text quickly to grab some general information and match the questions with the
paragraphs (A-H). There is one question you do not need to use.
1. So what’s the future of Lovely?
2. How did Lovely get its name?
3. Who did he visit to find out about making laws for his country?
4. What did he have to do to set up the country?
5. How do you apply to be a citizen?
6. What about money in Lovely?
7. How did it start?
8. Did he encounter any problems along the way?
Text: Other Worlds
A. Yesterday the world’s newest country was born when thousands of people gathered in
Leicester Square, London, to witness its naming and to meet the man they now consider their
king. And what is the name of the country, I hear you cry? The world’s newest nation is to be
called ‘Lovely’.
B. Six months ago, 28-year-old Danny Wallance, who earns his living as a TV comic and
‘ideas’ man, had a great idea. What if he started his own country and invited anyone who wanted
20
to join him to become a citizen? So, naming himself King Danny I and declaring hi s onebedroom flat in East London an independent state, he set about taking the necessary steps to
make his dream come true. He documented his progress in his BBC 2 series How to Start Your
Own Country, which comes to the end of its six-week run on Wednesday.
C. Over the six weeks, Danny explored the practicalities of forming your own country. The
first thing on his agenda was to hand in his Declaration of Independence to the prime minister at
Number Ten. With this out of the way, he was free to start thinking about things such as writing
a constitution and setting up a government. Then he was off to design his own flag and record his
own national anthem. He even got someone to design possible postage stamps for Lovely, with
his face on them!
D. Much of his time was spent travelling the world meeting politicians and dignitaries to
hear their advice on what it means to govern a country. He also took advice from a cardinal at
the Vatican, and from the linguist and philosopher Noam Chomsky on the nature of democracy.
After a trip to Death Row in the USA and moving interview with an inmate, Danny decided
against the death penalty for Lovely.
E. For economic advice, Wallace visited the chief cashier of the Bank of England. He
decided to create a brand new currency, which he called the Independent Occupational Unit
(IOU). However, you can’t open a bank account or take out a loan in Lovely. And forget trying
to draw out IOUs with a cash card for the simple reason that there aren’t any banks there. The
IOU is part of a much more casual economy, free from things such as interest rates. It’s based on
the phrase ‘time is money’. You basically do something for someone and they’ll do something
later for you.
F. Along the way, Danny also met with several disappointments. In one episode Danny
travelled to New York to try and get his country recognized by the United Nations.
Unfortunately, his request was ultimately turned down because of his lack of an independent
territory. Although Danny had bought his flat, he had not purchased the land on which it stands,
so officially his headquarters belonged to the UK. But what disappointed Danny most of all was
being refused entry to the Eurovision Song Contest with a song he specially recorded called
“Stop the mugging and start the hugging”. The reason he was given was that, since his country
had no radio or TV station, he could not become a member of the European Broadcasting Union.
G. The final thing Danny had to do was to find a name for his country. At his request,
citizens sent thousands of suggestions as to what this new country could be called. Ideas ranged
from Flatland to Wallaceland, Spexico to United Kingdan and Dantopia; someone even
suggested calling the country France! But, in the end, the final selection came down to just two:
Home or Lovely. And it was the citizens who made the final decision. Aiming to become the
most democratic democracy in the world, King Danny achieved a world first and let the people
decide. Lovely won the final vote.
H. With more than 58,000 citizens, Lovely is officially larger than the Vatican, San Marino,
Monaco and Liechtenstein, but whether the country will very much depend on how busy its
creator is. And, as Danny Wallace is much in demand for several other TV projects, it might fall
to other members of his government to keep things running. But with elections promised every
six months, the creation of the University of Lovely and several sporting events (including a
Scalextric Grand Prix) planned over the coming weeks, there are plenty of activities to keep the
citizens of Lovely occupied for quite a while yet.
Task 2. Read the text again and mark the statements T (true) or F (false). Correct the false
statements.
1. Lovely is based in Danny’s home.
2. The IOU is not really a very serious currency.
3. Lovely has been officially recognized by the UN.
4. Danny made the final decision on the naming of his country.
21
5. Danny might not always be able to devote a lot of time to running Lovely.
Task 3. In pairs or small groups, learners go through the questions and discuss them. Monitor
and help if necessary, encouraging learners to use any vocabulary they have learned from the
text. Ask pairs or groups to feedback to the class and discuss any interesting points further.
1) Does Lovely sound like a fun place? Would you like to be a citizen there?
2) What do you think Danny Wallace’s real reasons were for trying to start his own country?
3) Imagine you could start your own country. What would you call it and what laws would
you have?
4) Do you think Lovely was successful and still exists?
Answer Keys:
Task 1:
1) Paragraph 7
2) Paragraph 6
3) Paragraph 3
4) Paragraph 2
5) Not used
6) Paragraph 4
7) Paragraph 1
8) Paragraph 5
Task 2:
1) T
2) T
3) F (It was turned down due to the lack of independent territory)
4) F (He let his people vote)
5) T
Descriptor A learner
Task 1  matches the questions with paragraphs;
Task 2  recognizes true or false statements and corrects the false ones;
Task 3  participates in discussion;
 makes hypothesis;
 uses relevant vocabulary.
22
Unit 3: Virtual Reality
Subunit Expressing and justifying opinion about fantasy books and
films
Learning objectives 10.3.3 Explain and justify own and others’ point of view on a
wide range of general and curricular topics
10.4.3 Skim a range of lengthy texts with speed to identify
content meriting closer reading on a range of general
and curricular topics
10.4.5 Deduce meaning from context in extended texts on a
wide range of familiar general and curricular topics, and
some unfamiliar topics
Assessment criteria  Explain and justify own and others’ point of view
 Use skimming to identify content meriting closer
reading
 Identify the meaning and details of the reading texts
Level of thinking skills Knowledge and comprehension
Application
Higher order thinking skills
Task 1. Remind the learners that when they are looking for specific information, they can ignore
any parts of a text that do not relate to this task. Running their eyes over a text in this way is
called scanning.
Scan the four short reviews of computer games and decide which game is:
a) the worst
b) the best
c) the least expensive
d) the most informative
1.
The idea is brilliant: set in the Wild West, this is a clone of perhaps the most popular game ever,
Doom. Probably the best thing about this game is its introduction, with unusual camera angles,
excellent sound effects and just about every Western cliché there ever was. It goes downhill
when you get into the game itself. You spend your time creeping around deserted buildings,
endlessly shooting at hundreds of bad guys. You collect ammunition, health points and other
things that you can use to solve puzzles. But once you finish one level of the game, on you go to
another one which is remarkably similar. It’s a case of “Been there, done that” – eight times!
However, while you are playing, you can always listen to the background music, which is
terrific. Turn up the volume and enjoy it!
The Verdict: Makes you yawn at times, but good fun for fans of Westerns. ***$45
2.
Did you know that car games have a poor relation? Yes, it’s their motorbike cousins! Somehow
motorbike games never provide the same thrill as car games. But this version comes very close
and is easily the best available. There are eight different bikes, nine long tracks and a choice of
race styles: Grand Prix or the muddier scrambling type. The intelligence and speed of your 23
computer opponents is high, which guarantees a game demanding enough for the most advanced
racer. So get on your bikes!
The Verdict: A super-slick bike racer that does not disappoint *****$40
23
3.
Ice is very useful. It keeps food cold in your freezer and combines perfectly with Coca-Cola.
Tragically, of course, the passengers of the Titanic experienced the downside of ice. Namely that
if a ship hits a big piece of ice, the ship comes off worse. The real -life setting of the Titanic
disaster may seem a joyless subject, but there is plenty of historical fact and, thankfully no glory
detail. This is a first-person adventure, with a real sense of atmosphere. Unfortunately, though,
just as you start solving a few puzzles, the ship goes down. As the technology improves, games
of this type are becoming more and more elaborate, but there is just too little to do. What a
missed opportunity!
The Verdict: If you’re interested in the history of the ship, you will definitely learn something –
if not, give it a wide berth! **$40
4.
This game is so bad that I am sitting here unwilling to even write about it! But the magazine pays
to me to, so I must. Here goes … You are a bird-headed robot and you want to control a number
of cities. To do this, you have weapons, a shield and the ability to jump higher than the non-birdheads. You stomp around at a slow pace, searching for something to shoot at. When you do find
something, you end up at the mercy of the interface as well as the enemy. The control system is
useless. The graphics are appalling. The cities are flat and bare. The task is truly boring. What
more can I say? It’s coming out next month!
The Verdict: Avoid *$35
Task 2. Divide the class into groups of four and tell each person in the group to skim a different
review. Give a strict time limit of one minute and then allow students to briefly describe the
games to each other, sharing their personal opinion about them.
In groups of four, choose one review each and skim it to find out what sort of game is described.
Briefly describe the game to the others. Would you recommend it to your friends? Would you
like to play it yourself? Why? Why not?
Task 3. Find words or phrases which mean the same as a – j. The review number is given in
brackets.
a) an exact copy (1)
b) a frequently-used idea (1)
c) deteriorates (1)
d) bullets (1)
e) a feeling of excitement (2)
f) challenging (2)
g) gloomy (3)
h) complex (3)
i) walk with heavy steps (4)
j) vulnerable to (4)
Answer Keys:
Task 1:
a) 4
b) 2
c) 4
d) 3
Task 3:
24
a) clone
b) cliché
c) goes downhill
d) ammunition
e) thrill
f) demanding
g) joyless
h) elaborate
i) stomp around
j) at the mercy of
Descriptor A learner
Task 1  skims and scans the reviews and categorize them;
Task 2  skims one review and find out what sort of game is described;
 describes the game briefly and share their opinion about it;
Task 3  finds words and phrases from the texts which that match the given
meanings.
25
Unit 3: Virtual Reality.
Subunit Expressing and justifying opinion about fantasy books and
films
Learning objectives 10.1.7 Develop and sustain a consistent argument when
speaking or writing
10.3.7 Use appropriate subject-specific vocabulary and syntax
to talk about a range of general and curricular topics
10.3.3 Explain and justify own and others’ point of view on a
wide range of general and curricular topics
10.6.9 Use appropriately a wide variety of active and passive
simple present and past forms and past perfect simple
forms in narrative and reported speech on a wide range
of familiar general and curricular topics
Assessment criteria  Develop an argument and evolve reasoning while writing
or speaking
 Talk about given topics using appropriate syntax and
topic related vocabulary
 Express thoughts about the given topic in the
conversations and justify them
 Differentiate between active and passive forms and use
active and passive simple present and past forms and past
perfect simple forms in narrative and reported speech
Level of thinking skills Application
Higher order thinking skills
Task 1. Skim this extract from an article about ‘Googlewhacking’. Then fill each gap with a
suitable present tense of one of the verbs below. Use each verb once only. There is one extra
verb you do not need.
Add become claim change create encourage find out
Google mean refer sound spend submit update
Gary Stock, a very experienced Internet user, has come up with the new term
‘googlewhack’, which (0) refers to a simple entry on a Google search page. It (1)
______________ increasingly difficult for googlewackers like Gary to achieve their aim: the
appearance of the message “Results 1-1 of 1” on their computer screen. For one thing, people (2)
_______________ new web pages and (3) _______________ existing ones all the time, which in
turn (4) ____________ more and more entries on Google. Also, anyone who (5)
________________ their googlewhack to a website (6) _______________ another entry just by
doing that.
Perhaps all of this (7) _________________ like a waste of time, but Gary Stock (8)
__________: “Googlewacking is a meaningful activity that (9) ___________ people to surf the
web again, just like during the early days of the Internet.” According to many, Google (10)
______________ our lives by broadening our knowledge of the world. People certainly (11)
_____________ about new and unusual things by googlewacking – from ‘bartok nosepieces’ to
‘jillionaire incinerate’! But if you (12) ____________ these phrases on your computer today, wll
26
they still be googlewhacks?
Task 2. You are going to work in pairs. Retell the text, using appropriate past active and passive
forms and reported speech.
Assessment criteria:
1) Past Active forms
2) Past Passive forms
3) Reported speech
Task 3. Read the statements and say whether you agree or disagree with each one, giving your
reasons and providing examples.
a) Some people hate computers because they don’t understand them.
b) Computers belong to the 21
st
century; books don’t.
c) The Internet seems to offer an enormous amount of helpful information, but in fact, a lot
of it is dangerous, particularly for children.
d) People forget that computers may have a health risk
e) The virtual world is becoming more important in our lives.
Assessment criteria:
1) Grammar Accuracy (active and passive simple present and past forms, past perfect simple
forms, reported speech) – 1-2 minor mistakes;
2) Vocabulary Range – at least 5 vocabulary units related to the topic “Virtual Reality”;
3) Fluency and Pronunciation – 1-2 minor mistakes.
Answer Keys:
Task 1:
1) is becoming
2) are creating/ create
3) are updating/ update
4) means
5) submits
6) is adding/ adds
7) sounds
8) claims
9) is encouraging
10) is changing
11) find out
12) google
The extra verb is ‘spend’
Descriptor A learner
Task 1  identifies a suitable present tense form for each gap;
Task 2  recounts the text in the past, using appropriate past active and
passive forms and reported speech;
Task 3  expresses agreement / disagreement, give reasons and provide
examples.
27
Unit 4: Out of this world.
Subunit Things you didn’t know about space
Learning objectives 10.2.6 Deduce meaning from context in unsupported extended
talk on a wide range of general and curricular topics,
including talk on a limited range of unfamiliar topics
10.2.5 Recognize the attitude or opinion of the speaker(s) in
unsupported extended talk on a wide range of general
and curricular topics, including talk on a limited range of
unfamiliar topics
Assessment criteria  Reach an answer or a decision by thinking carefully
about the known facts from the listening
 Identify the position of speakers in an extended talk with
some support
Level of thinking skills Knowledge and comprehension
Task 1. You are going to listen to the radio interview about technology and space missions. For
each question, choose the correct picture A, B or C.
Recourse: Mann M. Laser B1. Student’s Book, p.46
1. What does the presenter have in his bedroom?
A) B) C)
2. What was first used on an Apollo space mission?
A) B) C)
3. What are more comfortable because of space technology?
A) B) C)
28
4. What will be more important for the next mission to Mars?
A) B) C)
5. What might be part of a communication and entertainment system in the future?
A) B) C)
Task 2. Listen carefully to what Angie says again. Decide whether the statements are correct
(put T) or incorrect (put F). Explain why the sentences are incorrect
1. A lot of space technology has been useful here on Earth __________.
2. We spend less than a billion euros on space research each year _______.
3. We will use robots in the next Mars mission ______.
4. Angie thinks life in 50 years’ time will be completely different ________.
5. Angie says travelling will be cheaper in the future _______.
6. Angie thinks the internet will be the same as it is today _______.
Answer Keys:
Task 1
1) A (digital) clock
2) B laptop
3) C trainers
4) B camera
5) B mobile phone
Task 2
1) T
2) F
3) T
4) F
5) F
6) F
Transcript
Presenter: With me in the studio today, I’m joined by Angie Hampson, and we’re going to talk
about how space missions affect the technology we have here on Earth. Angie, welcome to the
show.
Angie: It’s nice to be here.
Presenter: Now, we first went to the Moon over thirty years ago. How much of the technology
developed then has been useful here on Earth too?
Angie: Well, actually an enormous amount. For example, what kind of clock have you got by
29
your bed?
Presenter: A digital clock. Why?
Angie: Because the technology for digital watches and clocks came from the early NASA space
programmes. It’s quite possible that if we hadn’t gone into space, we wouldn’t have digital
clocks now.
Presenter: Amazing. What else?
Angie: Well, the very first laptop computer was designed for an Apollo space mission. But we’re
not just talking about electrical equipment. Do you sometimes were trainers?
Presenter: Yes, I do.
Angie: A lot of the technology they use to make them comfortable comes from research done for
space missions.
Presenter: And is this going to continue to happen in the future? As we go off to Mars, and
other parts of the Universe, are we going to see the technology they develop for those missions
having some use here on Earth too?
Angie: Yes, I think we will. The thing is, we spend billions and billions of euros each year on
space research. Now a lot of money at the moment, for example, is spent on developing lasers
and robots and cameras and computer equipment for the next mission to Mars. And in the future,
that technology will be available for us to use – in hospitals, in the home, in forecasting the
weather, in firefighting, in entertainment. You name it, it’ll use space technology.
Presenter: Fascinating. One final question, Angie. What do you think the world will be like in,
say, fifty years?
Angie: That’s a difficult question. I think in many ways it’ll be the same. We’ll still live in
houses, we’ll go to work, we’ll have family and friends. Where it will be different is with things
like travel and communication. We’ll be able to travel much faster than we can now – maybe
three or four hours from Europe to Australia, and I think mobile phones, the internet, radio and
television will probably all combine to produce this incredible communication and entertainment
system. But I might be wrong, of course!
Presenter: Well, time will tell. Angie, thank you very much for talking to us today.
Angie: My pleasure.
Recourse: Mann M. Laser B1. Student’s Book, p.46
Descriptor A learner
Task 1  identifies the appropriate item according to the speaker;
Task 2  recognizes correct and incorrect statements.
30
Unit 4: Out of this World.
Subunit Things you didn’t know about space
Learning objectives 10.1.9 Use imagination to express thoughts, ideas, experiences
and feelings
10.3.2 Ask and respond to complex questions to get
information about a wide range of general and curricular
topics
10.3.7 Use appropriate subject-specific vocabulary and syntax
to talk about a range of general and curricular topics
10.6.7 Use perfect continuous forms and a variety of simple
perfect active and passive forms including time
adverbials …so far, lately, all my life on a wide range of
familiar general and curricular topics
Assessment criteria  Convey fantasy ideas including emotions and senses
 Formulate questions that are more complex to get
information about the topic and respond to complex
questions
 Talk about given topics using appropriate syntax and
topic related vocabulary
 Practice usage of simple perfect forms to express recent,
indefinite and unfinished past including time adverbials
…so far, lately, all my life
Level of thinking skills Application
Higher order thinking skills
Task 1. Before starting a group/pair discussion allow learners to think individually and describe
what is happening in the pictures and compare the people.
Look at the pictures. Describe what is happening and compare the people. Will the general
public be able to go into space by 2020? Why? /Why not?
Note: The two pictures show an artist’s impression of astronauts working on the surface of
another planet, with a space craft and a science fiction still of people in statis (deep sleep)
during space travel.
31
You may use the following words:
Useful Vocabulary:
Astronauts: helmet, gravity, breathing apparatus, unknown source of light.
Statis: suspended animation, timescale, solar system, intergalactic, light speed.
Task 2. Discussion. Learners are working in small groups. The three discussion topics could be
given to groups in different parts of the room, with an optional reporting back phase on all three
at the end.
Discuss the following questions in small groups, explaining your opinion in detail. Use your
imagination to express thoughts, ideas, feelings and experiences. Use time adverbials such as
lately, so far, as long as, no sooner than, meanwhile, eventually in your speech.
Group 1 – Do you think you will ever take a holiday in space? Explain your answer.
Group 2 – Should governments spend tax-payer’s money on space travel? Explain your answer.
Group 3 – Why are there so many satellites orbiting the Earth? Will this technology become
more important, in your view? Why? Why not?
Self-Assessment Checklist. Learners are encouraged to evaluate their own progress and tick
where appropriate
Look through the list of statements and assess your own progress, ticking the correct column:
# Points to Evaluate Yes, it was
easy
No, I had some
problems
1. I have described what is happening in the pictures
2. I have compared the people
3. I have used at least 4 words on the topic “Space”
4. My sentences were grammatically correct
5. I have answered the question, expressing my
opinion in details.
6. I was active working in pairs and small groups
7. I used time adverbials
If a learner experiences difficulties they are free to ask their teacher or peers for extra assistance.
Descriptor A learner
Task 1  describes what is happening in the pictures;
 compares the people using topical vocabulary and appropriate
sentence structure;
Task 2  answers the questions, explaining personal opinions in detail;
 assesses his/her progress using self-assessment checklist.
32
Unit 4: Out of this World.
Subunit Things you didn’t know about space
Learning objectives 10.4.2 Understand specific information and detail in extended
texts on a range of familiar general and curricular topics,
and some unfamiliar topics
10.4.5 Deduce meaning from context in extended texts on a
wide range of familiar general and curricular topics, and
some unfamiliar topics
Assessment criteria  Identify and analyse text structure to find
specific/certain information
 Identify the meaning and details of the reading texts on
familiar topics and draw conclusion by reasoning
Level of thinking skills Knowledge and comprehension
Task. Read the article and decide which answer A, B, C or D best fits each gap. There is an
example at the beginning (0)
New hunt for life in space
British space scientists are planning to join the Americans (0) _____ the race to find evidence
of life on other planets. Alan Penny and his team at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory have (1) …
a telescope that is 40 times more (2) _____ than Hubble. (3) _____ as ‘Darwin’, this telescope
could tell if planets 50 light years away have any (4) _____ of life on them. Two days after NASA
scientists had shown proof that one of Jupiter’s moons could support life, Penny (5) _____ that his
telescope may be included in a European Space Agency mission. The Darwin project, with a (6)
_____ of £1500 million, is on a shortlist of two proposals. If approved, it will probably be (7) _____
in around five years’ time, its destination somewhere between Mars and Jupiter. The blueprint is
actually for five telescopes positioned 50 metres (8) _____ in space, slowly circling a central
processing station. The combined data from these telescopes would (9) _____ a full picture of a
planet, picking out faint images that have never been seen before. Darwin would not be able to take
detailed photographs of the planets it (10) _____ , but Penny believes a second-generation telescope
could be sent up to do this. He claims it is worthwhile mapping the universe around our own
galaxy, even though these planets lie (11) … our reach for the moment. The European Space
Agency is expected to make a (12) _____ shortly on whether the Darwin project will go ahead.
1. A. thought B. intended C. designed D. drawn
2. A. striking B. powerful C. forceful D. strong
3. A. known B. called C. considered D. armed
4. A. shape B. race C. brand D. kind
5. A. announced B. spoke C. advertised D. told
6. A. price B. schedule C. charge D. told
7. A. driven B. fetched C. launched D. taken
8. A. apart B. far C. distant D. away
9. A. save up B. end up C. build up D. put up
10. A. invents B. searches C. discovers D. looks
11. A. out B. toward C. beyond D. over
12. A. conclusion B. decision C. verdict D. view
33
Answer Keys:
1. C
2. B
3. A
4. D
5. A
6. D
7. C
8. A
9. C
10. C
11. C
12. B
Descriptor A learner
Task  reads the text;
 decides which answer best fits each gap.
34
Unit 4: Out of this World
Subunit A sci-fi film review
Learning objectives 10.2.1 Understand the main points in unsupported extended talk
on a wide range of general and curricular topics, including
talk on a limited range of unfamiliar topics
10.2.7 Understand speaker viewpoints and extent of explicit
agreement between speakers on a range of general and
curricular topics
Assessment criteria  Recognize the main idea in the conversation while
listening
 Identify speaker opinion and extent of explicit agreement
between speakers
Level of thinking skills Knowledge and comprehension
Task 1. You are going to listen to someone talking about the world of Pandora from the film
Avatar. Listen and put the points in the order they are mentioned. Write 1 – 4 in the boxes.
A. Advice to people suffering from post-Avatar depression
B. A synopsis of the film
C. Examples of what some people are saying on the Internet
D. Some features of Pandora
Task 2. Listen to the review again and choose the correct answers.
1. Many people are unhappy after watching Avatar because
A. they know they will never be able to live in place like Pandora
B. they found the end of the film too depressing
C. they didn’t want it to finish
2. Elequin is trying to overcome the depression by
A. talking to other people who feel the same way
B. searching the Internet for more information about the film
C. watching the film over and over again
3. As examples of how well-researched Pandora is, the speaker talks about
A. The language and wildlife found on the moon
B. The special effects of the film
C. The personalities of the Na’vi people
4. The lesson that the speaker believes Avatar can teach us is that
A. we should never take films too seriously
B. we should just accept the imperfect world we live in
C. we should appreciate and protect the world we live in
Answer Keys:
Task 1: D; A; B; C
Task 2: 1) a; 2) b; 3) a; 4) c
35
Transcript
Speaker: James Cameron’s sci-fi epic Avatar may be the highest-grossing film of all time
but for some viewers it’s all proving to be a little bit too perfect. For those of you who haven’t yet
seen the film – is there really anyone who hasn’t yet seen the film? – the action takes place on an
utopian moon called Pandora. Set in the future, it basically tells the story of how this beautiful
place is raided by an Earth-based mining corporation who want to try and take away huge amounts
of a valuable, rare mineral that is found there. This brings then into conflict with the natives of the
planet, a peace-loving race of three-metre tall, blue-skinned creatures called Na’vi. What follows
ia a battle for the very survival of Pandora and its people.
However, internet message boards have recently been receiving a large number of messages
from people who are suffering from post-Avatar depression. Ans the reason for their unhappiness?
Knowing that they will never be able to live in the world as perfect as Pandora. On the site ‘Avatar
Forums’, the topic ‘Ways to cope with the depression of the dream of Pandora being intangible’
has more that 1000 posts. Obviously that’s far too many for me to read out, but this one by the user
under the name of Elequin is a reflection of the general mood. He or she says, “That’s all I have
been doing of late, searching the internet for more info about Avatar. I guess that helps. It is so
hard. I can’t force myself to think that it’s just a movie, and to get over it, that living like Na’vi
will never happen”. Another nameless contributor wrote, “When I woke up this morning after
watching Avatar for the first time yesterday, the world seemed grey. I just seesms meaningless”.
The fact that Avatar can provoke such strong feelings just shows what a great job the film
makers did in constructing the fictional world of Pandora. Of course, this fantasy world, with its
weird and wonderful plant and animal life, is really brought to life using stunning special effects
and 3D filming. But what’s really impressive is the research that went into creating this other
world, including things that aren’t always obvious on the big screen.
For example, did you realise that a new language was specially created for Na’vi? This was
done by the linguistics professor Paul Frommer of the University of Southern California. He
created over a thousand words for the language, which he then taught to the actors.
In addition, a whole world of wonderful plants and animals were devised by a team of
specialists. Hours of work went into thinking about what this wildlife would look like and how it
would behave on the moon. Each animal and plant was supplied with a name and detailed
description. You can even buy a guide to the plant life of Pandora.
It was details like these that helped Cameron build such an entirely believable fictional
world. But apart from the absolute beauty of Pandora, what has attracted so many viewers to the
film in such an amazing way is the Na’vi people themselves. Their peace-loving personalities and
their ability to interact so perfectly with the natural world that surrounds them stands in stark
contrast to the greedy humans who are trying to destroy their paradise. And, of course, it doesn’t
take a lot of insight to see that the film is also reminding us of the speed with w hich we are tearing
up the wonderful world we live in. Perhaps all those who are experiencing post-Avatar depression
could help themselves by remembering that we still live in a beautiful world and that they should
get out there and make sure we don’t destroy it.
Resource: Herbert Puchta, Jeff Stranks & Peter Lewis-Jones. English in Mind 5, SB., p. 29
Descriptor A learner
Task 1  puts the points in the order they are mentioned;
Task 2  chooses the correct answers.
36
TERM 3
Unit 5: Stress and Fear
Subunit Describing the symptoms of stress
Learning objective 10.2.2 Understand specific information in unsupported extended
talk on a wide range of general and curricular topics,
including talk on a limited range of unfamiliar topics
Assessment criteria  Identify specific information in extended talk
Level of thinking skills Knowledge and comprehension
Task 1. Before listening, ask learners to match the following words with definitions.
Word Definitions
1. Unemployment A. The amount of work to be done, especially by a particular person or
machine in a period of time
2. Powerlessness B. The reason why something, especially something bad, happens
3. Workload C. To experience physical or mental pain
4. Suffer D. The state of not having a job
5. Cause (n) E. The condition or feeling of having no power
Task 2. Listen to 4 people talking about causes of stress and match each speaker with the reason of
stress from the list below.
Link https://ieltsonlinetests.com/ielts-mock-test-2017-november-listening-practice-test-2
A. Bad management
B. Dual-career family
C. Fear of unemployment
D. New technologies
E. Working surroundings
F. Powerlessness
G. Too much work
Example: Ramon - teamwork
1. Kikuko _________________
2. Boris ___________________
3. Etienne _________________
4. Nagwa _________________
Task 3. Answer the following questions.
1. How many people participated in the study of Dr. Clare Greenhill?
2. According to Kikuko, why does her company face difficulties?
3. What are the other factors that make Boris stresses?
4. According to the interviewer, what are three things that cause people stress?
5. How does Nagwa describe her working conditions?
Answer keys:
Task 1.
1. D
2. E
3. A
37
4. C
5. B
Task 2.
1. C
2. G
3. D
4. E
Task 3.
1. 5,000 workers from 30 different countries.
2. Because the bosses made a number of bad decisions.
3. Boris and his wife have full-time jobs and have no time to relax.
4. Computers, e-mails, cell-phones.
5. Noisy, hot, unventilated conditions.
Transcript
Disc Jockey: And now, after that old favourite from “The Corrs” entitled ”1 never loved you
anyway”, we have Dr. Greenhill to talk to us today about stress in the workplace . Is it getting
worse, Dr. Greenhill?
Dr. Greenhill: I’m not sure whether it’s getting worse or just that more people are talking about it.
Certainly lots more people are complaining about it. I’ve just completed a study of 5,000 workers
from 20 different countries. And I’ve taken a multi-cultural approach to the subject.
Disc Jockey: And what have you found?
Dr. Greenhill: That broadly speaking the cause of stress are similar all over the world. For
example, Ramon from Mexico City says that society measures people by individual success. But,
he says, increasingly work is organized in teams. This means there’s a conflict between personal
goals and the need to cooperate with one’s colleagues. He finds this an acute source of stress,
actually.
Then there’s Kikuko, from Osaka, Japan, who says she’s under a lot of stress because the company
she’s worked for 30 years is in difficulties. She says it’s because her boss has made a number of
bad decisions, but really what worries her most is that she might lose her job. You know, she’s in
her 50s and at that age it’s not easy to find another one. She says that she also
feels overworked and that’s getting her stressed out too.
Well, then there’s Boris, from Odessa in the Ukraine. He puts overwork at the top of this list of
stressors. Then there are other factors. Both he and his wife have full-time jobs so that when they
get home they don’t get to relax much either.
I guess that’s a problem most of us can relate to!
Disc Jockey: We always hear about computers, e-mails and cell phones as things which get people
tearing their hair out. Is this true?
Dr. Greenhill: Mmm. In many cases, yes, but not so much as you might think-only only 15
percent of respondents give this as the main cause- Etienne from Quebec. Canada, is one-though
he also mentions change and the feeling of being a victim of circumstances beyond his control.
Other people talk about the amount of work which comes with continual change as being more
stressing than new technologies themselves. People feel they lack stability in their working life.
But we must remember that in many places it’s really lack of new technology that puts people
under most pressure . Take Nagwa from Sohag in Egypt, for example. She says that for her the
main source of stress was working in noisy, hot, unventilated conditions day out and with no end
in sight. So it seems, we can’t win either way!
Descriptor A learner
Task 1  shows the correct understanding of the key vocabulary;
Task 2  identifies four speakers’ reasons of stress;
Task 3  answers open-ended questions.
38
Unit 5: Stress and Fear
Subunit Describing the symptoms of stress
Learning objective 10.1.5 Use feedback to set personal learning objectives
10.3.5 Interact with peers to make hypotheses about a wide range
of general and curricular topics
10.6.1. Use a variety of abstract compound nouns and complex
noun phrases on a range of familiar general and curricular
topics, and some unfamiliar general and curricular topics
Assessment criteria  Develop personal learning objectives based on the
classmates’ feedback
 Discuss the topic with peers, agree or disagree on it and
make conclusions to fulfil the task
 Use the abstract and complex nouns in the context properly
Level of thinking skills Application
Higher order thinking skills
Task 1. Divide learners into 3 groups.
Look at the picture and make assumptions on why is the person stressed. Discuss in groups the
following questions:
 What are the causes of stress?
 What problems might the man / woman / boy have?
 How would you describe his/her emotional state? Use adjectives and abstract compound
nouns and complex noun phrases such as love, fear, anger, a source of stress, a symptom of
stress, strike fear into somebody, hopelessly in love to describe his/her feelings.
Picture 1
Picture 2
Picture 3
Task 2. Present your ideas to the group(s). While you are presenting your ideas, other groups are
peer assessing you based on prepared assessment criteria and give feedback to presenters. Ask
questions and comment on your classmate’s speech.
Task 3. Read feedback that your classmates gave to you. Based on this feedback put a personal
learning objective on your improvement.
Task 4. Make a two-three step action plan to show what you will do to achieve your learning
objective.
39
Possible assessment sheet
Criteria Stars
answers 3 questions (1 = 1 star)
uses adjectives to describe feelings (1 adj = 1 star)
support answers with reasons ( 1 reason = 1 star)
uses compound nouns and complex noun phrases (1 noun = 1 star)
Total
Comments how to improve speech:
Descriptor A learner
Task 1  interacts with peer in a group;
 answers the questions;
Task 2  presents ideas in a class;
 uses adjectives to describe feelings;
 uses compound nouns and complex noun phrases;
 answers classmates’ questions;
Task 3  reads feedback and sets a personal learning objective on improvement
of a given presentation;
Task 4  makes a plan how to achieve this learning objective.
40
Unit 5: Stress and Fear
Subunit Describing the symptoms of stress
Learning objectives 10.5.4 Use style and register to achieve appropriate degree of
formality in a growing variety of written genres on a range
of general and curricular topics
10.5.7 Use independently appropriate layout at text level on a
range of general and curricular topics
Assessment criteria  Determine and use the appropriate style and register in
writing
 Use independently an appropriate layout in writing
Level of thinking skills Application
Task 1. Group the following symptoms / signs and reasons of stress accordingly.
Anxiety, financial issues, academic difficulties, insomnia, loss of appetite, family conflicts, heavy
workload, fast pace of life, overeating, fear of unemployment, nail biting.
Symptoms / signs of stress Reasons of stress
Task 2. Write a report on why people/children in Kazakhstan suffer from stress either at work, at
school, at home or on roads. Describe activities that tend to cause the most anxiety and the signs of
pressure that people most commonly show. Also, include a proposal on what could be done to help
the people.
Possible Assessment criteria:
 give reasons for stress;
 describe symptoms of stress;
 report possible consequences;
 recommend solutions of the problem;
 use at least 5 linking devices
Answer Keys:
Symptoms / signs of stress: anxiety, insomnia, loss of appetite, overeating, nail biting.
Reasons of stress: financial issues, academic difficulties, family conflicts, heavy workload, fast pace
of life, fear of unemployment.
Descriptor A learner
Task 1  classifies symptoms / signs and reasons of stress;
Task 2  gives reasons for stress, describes symptoms of stress and reports
possible consequences with solutions;
 determines and uses the appropriate style and register in a report;
 uses independently an appropriate layout in writing.
41
Unit 5: Stress and Fear
Subunits Giving advice on how to reduce stress
Learning objectives 10.2.3 Understand the detail of an argument in unsupported
extended talk on a wide range of general and curricular
topics, including talk on a limited range of unfamiliar
topics
10.2.4 Understand implied meaning in unsupported extended
talk on a wide range of general and curricular topics,
including talk on a limited range of unfamiliar topics
10.3.7 Use appropriate subject-specific vocabulary and syntax
to talk about a range of general and curricular topics
Assessment criteria  Identify the detail of an argument in a talk
 Recognize most of the implied meaning in the talk while
listening
 Use appropriate subject specific vocabulary in a dialogue
Level of thinking skills Knowledge and comprehension
Application
Task 1. Listen to the recording and list THREE parts of daily routine that can help REDUCE
STRESS. Write NO MORE THAN TREE WORDS for each answer.
Link https://ieltsonlinetests.com/ielts-mock-test-2017-november-listening-practice-test-2
1. ______________________________
2. ______________________________
3. ______________________________
Task 2. Listen to the recording again and complete the table below. Write NO MORE THAN
THREE words in each space.
Strategies for reducing stress from specific causes
Cause of stress: Strategies for reducing stress:
overwork 1.
fear of job loss 2.
new technologies 3.
Assessment criteria: Learners exchange their paper and peer-assess tasks 1-2 in accordance
with the answer keys given.
Task 3. Create a dialogue on giving advice how to cope with stress.
Speaker 1 – someone who feels stressed, speaker 2 – a friend giving advice on how to cope with
stress. Create a dialogue using the strategies for reducing stress from the listening activity (no
less than 4 strategies) and use the expressions below to give advice (no less than 3 expressions).
Present your dialogue to the class, and then switch the roles.
You should ….
You ought to…
What I suggest is …
Why don’t you …?
42
How about ….?
If I were you, I would …
You’d better ….
You should:
 create a dialogue
 use no less than 4 strategies for reducing stress
 use no less than 3 expressions on giving advice to cope with stress.
Assessment form
Students’ names Use of strategies for reducing stress
(specific examples)
Expressions on giving advice
(specific examples)
Answer keys:
Task 1.
1. A balanced diet or vary your diet.
2. Drink less coffee.
3. Take regular exercise.
Task 2.
1. Manage time better or manage your time better.
2. Make plans or set money aside.
3. Do training course.
Transcript
Disc Jockey: So, what can we as individuals do to make things easier for ourselves?
Dr. Greenhill: Well, I’ve talked to a number of specialists about this- doctors
and psychologists – and here are a few suggestions for reducing stress without you having to
change your job! First, vary your diet: fish, pasta, vegetables, fruit and so on. Try not to live off
sandwiches and fast food-a a balanced diet in other words. Also, we tend to drink too much
coffee. caffeine , the drug in coffee, gets us more nervous . So, if you want to feel less stressed ,
drink less coffee. It’s tough at first but you’ll notice the difference within just a few days. Finally,
take regular exercise. It’s a great way of relaxing and of course it makes you more healthy too!
For particular cause of stress there are various things you can do. If your problem is that
you think you’ve got too much work on your plate , what you probably need to do is to
manage time better.You have to learn to deal with the things which are really vital. Don’t waste
time on trivialities . There are courses to help you with this. If you are worried
about unemployment , make plans so that if it happens you are ready for it. Do things like set
money aside and update vour cv so it’s attractive to new employers. As for new technologies, do
training courses so that you feel at home with them and so that you don’t feel frightened of them.
So in the end the best way to deal with stress is for you to take control of your life and not allow
yourself to be a victim of circumstance.
Disc Jockey: Thank you, Dr. Greenhill on fighting stress, and, just when you thought you
could relax, here’s Dolly Parton working 9 to 5…
Descriptor A learner
Task 1  lists three daily routine parts that reduce stress;
Task 2  writes strategies for reducing stress answers open-ended questions;
43
Task 3  creates a dialogue;
 uses no less than 4 strategies for reducing stress;
 uses no less than 3 expressions on giving advice to cope with stress.
44
Unit 5: Stress and Fear
Subunit Analyzing and describing phobias and frightening situations
Learning objective 10.4.5 Deduce meaning from context in extended texts on a wide
range of familiar general and curricular topics, and some
unfamiliar topics
Assessment criteria  Deduce meaning from context in extended texts
Level of thinking skills Knowledge and comprehension
Task 1. Read the text and find the words from the text according to the definitions a-j.
TEEN STRESS
Teenagers today live in a very competitive world. It is more important than ever to succeed
at school if you hope to have a chance in the job market afterwards. It’s no wonder that many
young people worry about letting down their parents, their peers and themselves. To try to please
everyone, they take on too many tasks until it becomes harder and harder to balance homework
assignments, parties, sports activities and friends. The result is that young people suffer from
stress.
There are different ways of dealing with stress. Everyone knows that caffeine, in the form of
coffee or soft drinks, keeps you awake and alert. But caffeine is a drug which can become
addictive. In the end, like other drugs, caffeine only leads to more stress. There are better ways to
deal with stress: physical exercise is a good release for stress, because it increases certain
chemicals in the brain which calm you down. You have to get enough sleep to avoid stress and to
stay healthy and full of energy.
Another way to avoid stress is to manage your time effectively. It is better to do a few tasks
really well, than lots of tasks badly. Know your limits and try not to take on too much. Finally, If it
all gets beyond your control, don't panic or get hysterical. Find the time to sit down quietly and
breathe deeply for ten to twenty minutes. Do this regularly, and it will help you calm down and put
things into perspective.
A. to cause someone to be disappointed, often because you have failed to do what
you promised
B. causing a strong and harmful need to regularly have or do something
C. to experience or show the effects of something bad
D. achieve the desired aim or result
E. a feeling that you are free from something unpleasant
F. as good as or better than others of a comparable nature
G. to prevent something from happening or to not allow yourself to do something
H. feel or cause to feel anxious or troubled about actual or potential problems
I. to give several things equal amounts of importance, time, or money so that
a situation is successful
J. to develop a way to manage or relate to someone or something
Answer keys:
A. Letting down (someone)
B. Addictive
C. Suffer
D. Succeed
E. Release
F. Competitive
45
G. Avoid
H. Worry
I. Balance
J. Deal with
Reference to the text:
https://en.islcollective.com/download/printables/worksheets_doc_docx/reading_teen_stress/phrasal
-verbs/80208
Descriptor A learner
Task 1  identifies the words from the text according to the definitions given.
46
Unit 5: Stress and Fear
Subunits Analysing and describing phobias and frightening situations
Learning objectives 10.4.2 Understand specific information and detail in
extended texts on a range of familiar general and
curricular topics, and some unfamiliar topics
10.6.16 Use a wide variety of conjunctions on a wide range of
familiar general and curricular topics
Assessment criteria  Identify and analyse text structure to find specific/certain
information and detail in extended texts
 Connect words, phrases, clauses to explain reasons and
give explanations using appropriate conjunctions
including since, as and the structures so ... that, such a...
that
Level of thinking skills Knowledge and comprehension
Application
Task. Read the article below.
Scared of speaking a new language?
by : AriadneBlogger2017
There’s no denying that learning a foreign language is difficult,
and when it comes to speaking in the language, it can be extremely
daunting. I remember walking into my first-ever Spanish class at
university only to discover that half of my class was already fluent in
multiple languages. It’s safe to say I felt out of my depth!
At first the thought of speaking in Spanish terrified me; not only
were my vocabulary and grammar very limited, but I had never
spoken another language before. Despite my initial apprehension I
was determined to overcome my fear, and by adopting a few simple
strategies I have been able to build my confidence and develop at my own pace. So, I thought I
would share a few tips with you in the hope that you find them useful too.
Firstly, remember it is OK to make mistakes and that you should embrace them. This sounds
obvious, but when it comes to language learning we often aim for perfection and feel as though
we are not ready to speak until we have ‘enough’ words or grammatical knowledge. The truth is
you will never feel ready, and instead it is important to use the knowledge that you do have to
communicate what you can.
This leads on to my next tip: don’t compare yourself to others. This can be a hard one,
especially if you are in a large language class. It is important to remember that we all learn at
different speeds and through different styles of learning. By all means, keep up with your c lass
material, but do not stress if you don’t understand everything – especially in the early stages.
Something that really helped me progress was finding a patient language exchange partner.
Finding someone to practice with whose level of English was similar to my level of Spanish
made me feel much more confident.
Lastly, celebrate the small successes and remember how far you have come! Instead of
focusing on how far you have to go, focus on the progress you have already made and be proud
of your achievements!
Task 1. Decide whether the following statements are True (T) or False (F) and justify your
answer with the evidence from the text.
47
1. Few people believe that learning a foreign language can be challenging. T / F
________________________________________________________________________
2. The majority of students in the author’s class had a good command of several languages.
T /F
________________________________________________________________________
3. Before learning to speak Spanish, the author hadn’t spoken other foreign languages. T /F
________________________________________________________________________
4. There’s nothing wrong to make mistakes when learning a new language. T / F
________________________________________________________________________
5. The author thinks that you may start speaking the foreign language once you succeed in
learning enough vocabulary and making your grammar perfect. T / F
________________________________________________________________________
Task 2. Answer the questions below. Do not copy from the text. Paraphrase.
1. Why was the author scared about speaking in Spanish at first?
________________________________________________________________________
2. According to the author, why do people learn languages differently?
________________________________________________________________________
3. Did the author cope with his fear of speaking in Spanish? Give one specific evidence
from the text.
________________________________________________________________________
Task 3. Classify the conjunctions in bold and italic from the text with their types.
And, but, if, so, as though, or, so, not only…but.
Coordinating conjunctions:
bring ideas together.
Subordinating conjunctions:
connect an independent clause
to a dependent clause.
Correlative
conjunctions: come in
pairs; connect two equal
grammatical items
Task 4. Make up your own example with all three types of conjunctions.
1. ________________________________________________________________________
2. ________________________________________________________________________
3. ________________________________________________________________________
Possible assessment criteria: Mini whiteboards – each learner has a mini whiteboard. As they
classify the conjunctions and make own examples, they walk around the classroom and see each
other’s work. Learners are welcome to comment on peers’ mini whiteboards.
Answer keys:
Task 1.
1. False: “There’s no denying that learning a foreign language is difficult”.
2. False: “…that half of my class was already fluent in multiple languages”.
3. True: “…but I had never spoken another language before”.
48
4. True: “remember it is OK to make mistakes and that you should embrace them”.
5. False: “The truth is you will never feel ready, and instead it is important to use the
knowledge that you do have to communicate what you can”.
Task 2.
1. The author had a fear of speaking Spanish because he had poor grammar and vocabulary;
moreover, he hadn’t spoken other foreign language before.
2. When learning a foreign language, people’s speeds and styles of learning differ.
3. Yes, he did. For instance, “Something that really helped me progress was finding a patient
language exchange partner”.
Task 3.
Coordinating conjunctions: and, but, or, so
Subordinating conjunctions: if, as though
Correlative conjunctions: not only…but
Reference to the article: http://learnenglishteens.britishcouncil.org/magazine/life-aroundworld/scared-speaking-new-language
http://grammar.yourdictionary.com/parts-of-speech/conjunctions/conjunctions.html
Descriptor A learner
Task 1  identifies if the statements are True of False and justify with the
evidence from the text;
Task 2  answers the open-ended questions;
Task 3  classifies conjunctions with their types;
 creates sentences with conjunctions.
49
Unit 6: Imagination and Creativity
Subunit Explain what inspiration is and where it comes from
Learning objective 10.1.2 Use speaking and listening skills to provide sensitive
feedback to peers
10.2.2 Understand specific information in unsupported extended
talk on a wide range of general and curricular topics,
including talk on a limited range of unfamiliar topics
10.3.4 Evaluate and comment on the views of others in a growing
variety of talk contexts on a growing range of general and
curricular topics
Assessment criteria  Listen to others and provide helpful feedback orally
 Identify appropriate specific information in order to answer
open-ended questions
 Evaluate and comment on the views of others
Level of thinking skills Knowledge and comprehension
Higher order thinking skills
Task 1. What inspired Shakespeare to write? Ben Crystal continues his visit to Stratford-uponAvon, learning about Shakespeare's education, marriage and the 'lost years' before he moved to
London. Listen and answer the questions.
https://learnenglish.britishcouncil.org/en/shakespeare/stratford-2-lost-years
1. Why was Stratford busy at Shakespeare’s time?
________________________________________________________________________
2. How old was Anne Hathaway when William Shakespeare married her?
___________________________________________________________________
3. According to Dr. Anjna Chouhan, what was Shakespeare inspired by?
________________________________________________________________________
4. How did Stratford affect Shakespeare’s writing?
________________________________________________________________________
5. What did Shakespeare write mainly about?
________________________________________________________________________
Task 2. Sit in front of a partner. Read the following statements from the recording and express
your opinion. While you are talking, you partner will assess your speech using peer assessment
sheet. Then turn your roles. Give each other feedback by telling the strong points of the speech and
what you partner to improve in his/her speech.
You can use the following phrases:
Your speech was good because…. Next time you should …..in order to improve your speech.
I see your point, but….
I partially agree/disagree with you….
According to Dr. Anjna Chouhan, “And between having his three children and
turning up in London a few years later in the 1590s, Shakespeare goes missing. There
is no record of him. So those years in between are called the lost years and there are
lots of stage ideas about what Shakespeare did during those lost years”.
50
What do you think about it?
Peer assessment sheet
Criteria Yes No
1. expresses opinion about the statement
2. uses phrases that are given in the example
Advantages of the speech:
Recommendations on improvement:
Reference: https://learnenglish.britishcouncil.org/en/shakespeare/stratford-2-lost-years
Transcript
Stratford in Shakespeare’s time was a busy place. It was a market town; people would have travelled
far and wide to be here, bringing their life stories with them. If Shakespeare heard them they would
have fired his imagination and been great ground for play writing.
At 18 William married a local woman, Anne Hathaway, who was eight years older than him.
Dr Anjna Chouhan: Anne was three months pregnant on their wedding day, so six months later she
gave birth to their first child, a daughter, Susanna. And two years after Susanna, twins were born,
Hamnet and Judith, a boy and a girl. So he’s twenty-two, and he’s got three children and a wife. It’s
a lot of pressure on him. And between having his three children and turning up in London a few
years later in the 1590s, Shakespeare goes missing. There is no record of him. So those years in
between are called the lost years and there are lots of strange ideas about what Shakespeare did
during those lost years.
Ben: What are some of your favorite ideas about where he went, what happened to him over these
years?
AC: I think that William was inspired by travelling groups of actors who came to visit Stratfordupon-Avon when he was living here, and I think that he saw some of their plays when they set up in
the streets and in the taverns, and he thought that’s for me and travelled to London with them.
Ben: Did Stratford have a great influence on his writing?
AC: Stratford had a really important influence on Shakespeare’s writing. He was inspired by the
tradespeople he saw here, the schoolmasters, and especially the countryside. He writes a lot about
trees and forests and flowers and herbs in all of his plays, so he is inspired by all of the things that
are happening around him.
There are so many questions we have about Shakespeare that we’ll never get answers to, but coming
here to Stratford, seeing where he grew up, where he went to school, where he was buried, it brings
the man that most of us were introduced to in a book on a page back to life.
Answer keys:
Task 1
1. It was a market town; people would have travelled far and wide to be here, bringing their life
stories with them.
2. She was 26.
3. Shakespeare was inspired by travelling groups of actors who came to visit Stratford.
51
4. Stratford had a great influence on Shakespeare’s writing. He was inspired by the
tradespeople and schoolmaster he saw here, and the countryside.
5. He wrote a lot about trees, forests, flowers and herbs.
Descriptor A learner
Task 1  answers open-ended questions;
Task 2  analyzes Shakespeare’s life;
 makes own judgments and draw conclusions on the lost years of
Shakespeare’s life;
 hypothesizes what might have happened during that time;
 assesses partner’s speech using peer assessment sheet;
 gives constructive feedback to peers on a delivered speech by using
such phrase as Your speech was good because…. Next time you should
…..in order to improve your speech
52
Unit 6: Imagination and Creativity
Subunit Explain what inspiration is and where it comes from
Learning objective 10.2.6 Deduce meaning from context in unsupported extended
talk on a wide range of general and curricular topics,
including talk on a limited range of unfamiliar topics
10.3.3 Explain and justify own and others’ point of view on a
wide range of general and curricular topics
Assessment criteria  Identify the meaning of the words from the context
 Give information about the topic and prove it by
explaining and justifying own and others’ point of view
Level of thinking skills Knowledge and comprehension
Higher order thinking skills
Task 1. You will hear two students discussing the subject of rock art. Listen to and read the
following words in context and choose the most appropriate definition for each word in bold.
https://www.ielts-exam.net/practice_tests/50/IELTS_Listening_9_Section_3/476/#AB (listen till
2:10 min).
1. I really needed to go over it with someone.
a. to begin or carry on with an activity
b. to examine or loot at something in a careful or detailed way
c. to be fond of, to be interested in
2. Yes, the rock drawings in the caves of Lascaux in western France.
a. the round hole at the top of a volcano
b. a very narrow space between parts of something
c. a large hole in the side of a hill, cliff, or mountain, or one that is underground
3. But you can also find some human representations, as well as some signs.
a. description
b. symbolism
c. perspective
4. And the third most commonly drawn creature was the stag.
a. beast
b. personage
c. man
5. Well, the bulls are depicted very figuratively - they're not very realistic.
a. captured
b. represented
c. stated
6. There doesn't appear to be much evidence of signs.
a. clue
b. proof
c. key
7. In one or two chambers, you do find pictures of fish but they're quite rare.
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a. frequent
b. not common
c. occasional
Task 2. You have 5 minutes to discuss the following questions with a partner.
 How can people enjoy the drawings today?
 Why did early humans take so much time to paint instead of hunt?
 Why the most depicted animal was horse?
Assessment criteria. Learners peer-assess task 1. Task 2 can be assessed by teacher. Teacher
comes to each pair and gives feedback.
Teacher can use the checklist below to give feedback to learners.
Teacher’s checklist
Answers the questions fully Expresses ideas clearly Justifies ideas properly
Student1
Student2
Student3
Student4
Answer Keys:
1. B
2. C
3. A
4. A
5. B
6. B
7. B
Reference:
https://www.ielts-exam.net/practice_tests/50/IELTS_Listening_9_Section_3/476/#AB
Transcript
Mia: Hello, David.
David: Oh hi, Mia. Sorry I'm a bit late.
Mia:
Oh. No problem! Thanks for agreeing to help me with my assignment today. I
really needed to go over it with someone.
David: Sure. You were going to talk about European rock art, weren't you?
Mia: Yes, the rock drawings in the caves of Lascaux in western France.
David: Oh, fantastic, over 13,000 years old, I believe. What sort of drawings are they?
Mia:
They're drawings of animals on the whole, but you can also find some human
representations, as well as some signs. There are roughly 600 drawings at
Lascaux.
David: Really? Were they mostly pictures of bulls?
Mia:
Well, no, actually, the animal most depicted was the horse. Have a look at this
graph. It shows the distribution of the different animals. You see... first the horse.
and then after that a sort of prehistoric bull...
David: Oh, OK. That's interesting, isn't it?
Mia:
...and the third most commonly drawn creature was the stag. There were some
other animals but these are the main ones.
David: What are the drawings like? I mean, what sort of style?
Mia:
Well, the bulls are depicted very figuratively - they're not very realistic. They are
very big by comparison to the other drawings, of people and signs. They appear to
54
be almost three-dimensional in some cases, following the contours of the cave
walls, but of course they're not.
David:
Amazing. Perhaps they felt these animals were the most impressive and needed to
be represented like that.
Mia:
Yeah, maybe. The drawings of humans by contrast consist of just simple lines.
Like the stick figures my little sister draws. Perhaps humans were seen as less
important.
David: Mmm, perhaps. What about the signs. How did they draw them?
Mia:
There doesn't appear to be much evidence of signs, and those that have been found
are usually made up of little points.
David: Rather like Aboriginal art from Australia.
Mia: Yes. Something like that, but not as complex, of course.
David:
So apart from the bulls and horses and stags, were there any other creatures
depicted?
Mia: In one or two chambers, you do find pictures of fish but they're quite rare.
Descriptor A learner
Task 1  identifies the meaning of the words from the context;
Task 2  discusses the topic giving a reasonable argument;
 expresses own or peer’s point of view taking part in discussion.
55
Unit 6: Imagination and Creativity
Subunit Explain what inspiration is and where it comes from
Learning objective 10.3.2 Ask and respond to complex questions to get information
about a wide range of general and curricular topics
10.3.3 Explain and justify own and others’ point of view on a
wide range of general and curricular topics
10.6.5 Use a wide variety of question types on a wide range of
familiar general and curricular topics
Assessment criteria  Formulate questions that are more complex to get
information about the topic.
 Explain and justify own and others’ point of view on a
wide range of general and curricular topics
 Demonstrate an ability to make up questions in different
tenses and modal forms
Level of thinking skills Application
Higher order thinking skills
Task 1. Divide the class into learners A and learners B. Learners A are given a photo of the
famous painting “The Persistence of Memory” (1931) by Salvador Dali; learners B – “The Two
Fridas” (1939) by Frida Kahlo.
Learners are to brainstorm ideas in their groups, and then individually prepare 5 questions
based on Bloom’s taxonomy (2 questions to gather information; 2 questions to process information
and 1 question for analysis). Once learners have made 5 questions each, they join in pairs learners
A and B, and ask and answer each other’s questions. Learners should give full answers and be able
to justify own opinions and explain what their peers’ point of view upon the given paintings are.
Assessment criteria. First learners in their groups share their questions and correct them if
necessary. Then, when joining in pairs, learners fill in the assessment form.
Peer assessment sheet
Criteria Yes No
 asks 5 questions to get information about the painting;
 responds to 5 questions giving full answers;
 creates 2 questions for gathering information; 2 questions
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for processing and 1 question for analysis grammatically
correct;
 justifies own point of view and explains his/her partner’s
opinion on the painting.
Advantages of the speech:
Recommendations on improvement:
References: https://westburyarts.org/celebrating-womens-history-art-frida-kahlo/
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Persistence_of_Memory
Descriptor A learner
Task  asks 5 questions to get information about the painting;
 responds to 5 questions giving full answers;
 creates 2 questions for gathering information; 2 questions for
processing and 1 question for analysis grammatically correct;
 justifies own point of view;
 explains his/her partner’s opinion on the painting.
57
Unit 6: Imagination and Creativity
Subunit Creative people
Learning objective 10.4.5 Deduce meaning from context in extended texts on a wide
range of familiar general and curricular topics, and some
unfamiliar topics
10.4.7 Recognize patterns of development in lengthy texts [interparagraph level] on a range of general and curricular topics
Assessment criteria  Deduce meaning from context in extended texts
 Identify logical flow of events in a reading passage
Level of thinking skills Knowledge and comprehension
Task 1. You are going to read a biography of Leonardo Da Vinchi. Seven sentences have been
removed from the text. Choose from sentences A-H the one which fits each gap (1-7). There is
one extra sentence which you don’t need.
Leonardo Da Vinchi (1452-1519)
Leonardo Da Vinci has become known as one of the best examples of a “Renaissance
Man.” A Renaissance Man is a term that describes what many artists were doing during the
Renaissance: they were exploring science, technology and art all at the same time.
Da Vinci was born in the Florence area of Italy in the 1400s. [1] _____Florence had been
in the Dark Ages for many years, but by the time Da Vinci was born, life had settled down enough
that people had time to learn about ancient art and science. [2] ____ Before the Renaissance,
paintings were very religious. Most were done in an iconic style, meaning the painter wanted
people to focus more on the religion behind the painting rather than the artistry. However, Da
Vinci had studied Greek and Roman art and wanted to make art in a similar style. Greek and
Roman art was very realistic and was inspired by scientific study. Da Vinci took it one step
further — when he painted human figures, even in clothes, he would start by drawing the skeleton,
then the body over that, then finishing the painting. His paintings and drawings of people were
very realistic. [3] ______
Accurate perspective was another part of painting that Medival art often ignored. Da
Vinci discovered a way of painting that showed depth. If something is far away, it looks very
small.
Medieval art was not very good at showing objects that were far away. [4] ______
Da Vinci used the curiosity and attention to detail he showed in his art in other areas as
well. He was also a great scientist, mathematician, engineer and many other things. He drew many
plans for machines that we now use, like helicopters and tanks.
[5] ______ Both require a great imagination and a curiosity about what is real and what
could be possible.
Da Vinci was well-known for his careful observations and research of the natural world.
[6] _____ Find a leaf outside and look at it very carefully. Try to find all the veins and stems in it,
and pay attention to its shape. [7] ______
A. Through careful observation, Da Vinci was able to paint backgrounds in a way that
looked realistic.
B. After you have looked at it, try to draw it in as much detail as you can.
C. At the time, Florence was the center of the Renaissance’s beginning.
D. Science and art were very closely linked during the Renaissance and were especially close
in Da Vinci’s mind.
E. One reason is that his interests were so varied that he wasn’t a prolific painter.
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F. People were inspired to try these things on their own and a whole new age of learning
began.
G. Many of his paintings and drawings were based on his findings.
H. His famous drawing, The Vetruvian Man is one of the first examples of someone trying to
map out the proportions of the human body.
Task 2. Read the text again and match the words in bold with the synonyms below.
1. Very much alike _____________________
2. View, outlook _______________________
3. Scrutiny ____________________________
4. Investigating ________________________
5. Neglect ____________________________
6. Adapt _____________________________
7. Concentrate ________________________
8. Very old ___________________________
9. Interest ____________________________
10. Encourage __________________________
Answer keys:
Task 1.
1. C: At the time, Florence was the center of the Renaissance’s beginning.
2. F: People were inspired to try these things on their own and a whole new age of learning
began.
3. H: His famous drawing, The Vetruvian Man is one of the first examples of someone trying
to map out the proportions of the human body.
4. A: Through careful observation, Da Vinci was able to paint backgrounds in a way that
looked realistic.
5. D: Science and art were very closely linked during the Renaissance and were especially
close in Da Vinci’s mind.
6. G: Many of his paintings and drawings were based on his findings.
7. B: After you have looked at it, try to draw it in as much detail as you can.
Task 2.
1. Similar
2. Perspective
3. Observation
4. Exploring
5. Ignored
6. Settle down
7. Focus (on)
8. Ancient
9. Curiosity
10. Inspired
Reference: https://www.education.com/download/worksheet/124096/leonardo-da-vinci.pdf
Descriptor A learner
Task 1  orders the missing sentences in the text;
Task 2  matches synonyms Shakespeare’s life.
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Unit 6. Imagination and Creativity
Subunit Creative people
Learning objective 10.6.11 Use a variety of reported statements and question forms
on a wide range of familiar general and curricular topics
Assessment criteria  Use reported speech commands (say, ask, tell) correctly
Level of thinking skills Application
Task 1. Imagine you are a journalist who takes interviews with famous people. Interview 3
creative people (artists, actors, singers, composers, designers, etc) to find out what inspires them to
create their masterpieces. Then, write a blog entry describing where creative people get inspiration.
Questions Participant 1 Participant 2 Participant 3
Q1
Q2
Q3
Task 2. Based on the interview data, write a blog entry about inspiration of creative people. You
should:
 Create a title for your blog
 Use logical structure
 Add a picture reflecting the topic of the blog
Descriptor A learner
Task 1  creates 3 questions;
 interviews 3 imagery people;
Task 2  analyzes the gained information;
 writes a blog entry.
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Unit 6. Imagination and Creativity
Subunit Creative people
Learning objective 10.5.3 Write with grammatical accuracy on a range of familiar
general and curricular topics
10.6.17 Use if / if only in third conditional structures
Assessment criteria  Demonstrate the ability to write grammatically correct
sentences on familiar topics
 Form second conditional clauses with if / unless/ if only
and use a variety of relative clauses including why
clauses
Level of thinking skills Application
Task. Imagine you are a sales manager who dreamed of becoming a famous actor / singer / artist.
You were really passionate about acting / singing / drawing and wanted to travel all around the
world and be famous. However, now you work in a sales company and regret of not following
your dream. Write a story of what could your life have been if you had fulfilled your dream.
 Describe your regrets
 Use third conditional structures (no less than 5 examples)
Descriptor A learner
 creates a story;
 uses third conditional structures.
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Unit 6: Imagination and Creativity
Subunit Multiple Intelligences
Learning objective 10.4.5 Deduce meaning from context in extended texts on a wide
range of familiar general and curricular topics, and some
unfamiliar topics
10.5.5 Develop with support coherent arguments supported
when necessary by examples and reasons for a wide range
of written genres in familiar general and curricular topics
Assessment criteria  Deduce meaning from context in extended texts
 Designate a clear position on an issue and outline coherent
arguments by stating claims, choosing evidence to support
their answer
Level of thinking skills Knowledge and comprehension
Higher order thinking skills
Task 1. Read the article about Gardner’s Theory of Multiple Intelligences.
Gardner first identified seven different types of intelligence, these being; linguistic, logicalmathematical, spatial, bodily- kinesthetic, musical, interpersonal and intrapersonal. In 1999 after
further research he added an 8th element to the equation; naturalistic intelligence, and at the time
of writing is investigating the possibility of a 9th; this being existential intelligence.
The first intelligence as defined by Gardner in the Theory of Multiple Intelligences,
linguistic intelligence, relates to an individual’s ability to process and communicate written and
spoken words. Such people are said to excel at reading, writing, story-telling, learning a foreign
language and the memorizing of words and dates. The logical-mathematical category is related to a
person’s ability to reason logically, think scientifically, make deductions and perform well in
mathematic calculations. Spatial intelligence is related to vision and spatial judgement; such
individuals have been observed to have a strong visual memory and the potential to excel in artistic
subjects. Those exhibiting a leaning towards the third classification, bodily-kinesthetic
intelligence, often learn best by physically practicing an action rather than by reading or seeing.
Musical intelligence, as the name suggests, relates to ability in defining differences in
rhythm and tones; individuals possessing musical intelligence are often able to sing, play musical
instruments and compose music to a high standard. Since a high level of audio -related ability
exists, many in this category are said to learn well in a lecture situation where they are required to
listen attentively to information. Interpersonal intelligence relates to an individual’s ability to
communicate and empathize with others; typically extrovert, they learn well through discussion,
debate and interaction with others. The last of the 7 original categories identified by Gardner,
intrapersonal intelligence, fits the opposite description of interpersonal intelligence; such
individuals working best independently. According to Gardner they are capable of high level s of
self-reflection and are often perfectionists.
Despite the criticism received from some of his contemporaries, Gardner’s theories are well
respected and often applied in the world of education as a tool for identifying children’s differing
abilities and potential career paths.
Task 2. Look at the table below and fill in the needs in accordance with the type of intelligence.
The Seven Multiple Intelligences in Children
Children who
are strongly:
Think Love Need
Linguistic in words reading, writing, telling
62
stories, playing word
games, etc.
LogicalMathematical
by reasoning
experimenting,
questioning, figuring out
puzzles, calculating, etc.
Spatial
in images
and pictures
designing, drawing,
visualizing, doodling, etc.
BodilyKinesthetic
through
somatic
sensations
dancing, running,
jumping, building,
touching, gesturing, etc.
Musical
via rhythms
and melodies
singing, whistling,
humming, tapping feet
and hands, listening, etc..
Interpersonal
by bouncing
ideas off
other people
leading, organizing,
relating, manipulating,
mediating, partying, etc.
Intrapersonal
deeply inside
themselves
setting goals, meditating,
dreaming, being quiet,
Assessment criteria: Mini whiteboards – each learner has a mini whiteboard. As they come up
with the needs for each type of intelligence, they walk around the classroom and look at peers’
mini whiteboards. Learners are welcome to comment on peers’ mini whiteboards.
Task 3. Write your type of intelligence: how you better accept information, what you like doing,
what your needs are.
Possible assessment criteria: Learners exchange their papers and peer-assess each other.
Criteria Yes No
- Organize your ideas
logically
- Use no less than 5
linking devices
- Provide 3 relevant
examples from your
life
Answer Keys (possible ideas):
Linguistic - books, tapes, writing tools paper diaries, dialogues, discussion, debate stories.
Logical- Mathematical - things to explore and think about, science materials, manipulatives, trips
to the planetarium and science museum.
Spatial - art, LEGOs, video, movies, slides, imagination games, mazes, puzzles, illustrated books,
trips to art museums.
Bodily- Kinesthetic - role play, drama, movement, things to build, sports and physical games,
tactile experiences, hands-on learning.
Musical - sing-along time, trips to concerts, music playing at home and school, musical
instruments.
Interpersonal - friends, group games, social gatherings, community events, clubs,
mentors/apprenticeships.
Intrapersonal - secret places, time alone, self-paced projects, choices.
63
Reference: https://ieltsonlinetests.com/sites/default/files/readingpracticetest2-v7-1534.pdf
Descriptor A learner
Task 1  analyzes 7 types of Gardner’s multiple intelligences;
 distinguishes the needs for each type of intelligence;
Task 2  organizes ideas logically;
 uses no less than 5 linking devices;
 provides 3 relevant examples from life.
64
Unit 7. Reading for pleasure
Subunit Learners read a classical fiction book
Learning objective 10.4.4 Read a wide range of extended fiction and non-fiction
texts on familiar and unfamiliar general and curricular
topics
10.4.9 Recognize inconsistencies in argument in extended texts
on a wide range of general and curricular topics
Assessment criteria  Skim and scan the extended fiction or non-fiction texts to
identify the general information
 Recognize inconsistencies in argument
Level of thinking skills Application
Higher order thinking skills
Task. Read the article about negative effects of computer addiction and decide whether the
statements below are True / False / Not given.
There is a great deal of debate in the medical community about the validity of computer
addiction. There is no doubt that some people use their computers, play computer games and chat
online too much for their own good. There are even some people whose computer use completely
consumes their lives. However, many psychologists believe computer addiction is a compulsive
behavior linked to an underlying condition, not something that should be classified as an addiction.
Computer addiction can have a variety of negative effects on a person. The most immediate
are social. The user withdraws from friends and family as he spends more and more time on
the computer. Relationships begin to wither as the user stops attending social gatherings, skips
meetings with friends and avoids family members to get more computer time. Even when they do
interact with their friends, users may become irritable when away from the computer, causing
further social harm.
Eventually, excessive computer use can take an emotional toll. The user gradually withdraws
into an artificial world. Constant computer gaming can cause someone to p lace more emotional
value on events within the game than things happening in their real lives. Someone whose primary
friends are screen names in a chat room may have difficulty with face-to-face interpersonal
communication.
Over the long term, computer addiction can cause physical damage. Using
a mouse and keyboard for many hours every day can lead to repetitive stress injuries. Back
problems are common among people who spend a lot of time sitting at computer desks. Late-night
computer sessions cut into much-needed sleep time. Long-term sleep deprivation causes
drowsiness, difficulty concentrating, and depression of the immune system. Someone who spends
hours at a computer is obviously not getting any meaningful exercise, so computer addiction can
indirectly lead to poor overall physical condition and even obesity.
Eventually, the consequences of computer addiction will ripple through the user's life. Latenight use or use at work will affect job performance, which could lead to job loss. As
the addiction takes its toll on family members, it can even lead to failed marriages.
1. There is a hot discussion among doctors about the actuality of the issue of computer
addiction. _____
2. Among computer addicts there are some whose lives were not affected by computer.
_____
3. There is a belief that computer addiction shouldn’t be considered as any other type of
addiction. _____
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4. Despite computer addiction, people still stay in touch with their families and friends and
their relationships do not suffer. _____
5. Addiction to computer games results in withdrawing from real world. ____
6. Those addicted to computers and virtual world face no problems in communicating with
real people. _____
7. Overweight can be one of the negative effects of computer addiction, _____
8. There is an increase in the number of divorces due to computer addiction. _____
Answer keys:
1. True
2. Not given
3. True
4. False
5. True
6. False
7. True
8. Not given
Reference https://computer.howstuffworks.com/internet/basics/computer-addiction3.htm
Descriptor A learner
Task  recognizes inconsistencies in argument through identifying if the
statements are true/false/not given.
66
Unit 7. Reading for pleasure
Subunit Learners read a classical fiction book
Learning objective 10.4.4 Read a wide range of extended fiction and non-fiction
texts on familiar and unfamiliar general and curricular
topics
10.4.6 Recognize the attitude or opinion of the writer in extended
texts on a wide range of familiar general and curricular
topics
Assessment criteria  Skim and scan the extended fiction or non-fiction texts to
identify the general information
 Analyse the information to identify author’s attitude and
viewpoint
Level of thinking skills Application
Higher order thinking skills
Task. Read the article about space tourism and answer the questions.
What is space tourism?
by Rosemary M
Space tourism is the term used to describe space travel for recreational or leisure purposes.
What was once only a dream – described in books such as Arthur C. Clarke's 2001: A Space
Odyssey – is now becoming a reality.
Futurologists are scientists who attempt to develop predictions of what life will be like in the
future. After the first man landed on the moon in 1969, they thought that hotels would be built on
the moon by the year 2000. Futurologists also considered the possibility that, in the 21st century,
families might go for a holiday on the moon. Neither of these predictions have come true yet – but
the rapid development of technology may mean these predictions are a possibility in the years to
come.
Space Adventures is currently the only company to have succeeded in sending paying
passengers into space. Space Adventures worked with the Federal Space Agency of the Russian
Federation and Rocket and Space Corporation Energia to facilitate flights for the world's first
private space explorers. Each person paid over $20 million for their 10-day trip to the International
Space Station.
Following several successful explorations into space, several companies are now considering
the possibility of enabling tourists to visit space. In order to make it more affordable, suborbital
space travel is being considered by many companies, including Virgin Galactic. Passengers would
be transported to a height of between 100 and 160km above earth, experience 3–6 minutes of
weightlessness and a view of the stars before being taken back down to earth. This is expected to
cost around $200,000 per person.
Whilst it could be an enriching experience, there are some disadvantages to space tourism.
Many critics have commented that a huge growth in the spaceflight industry could drastically
speed up the process of global warming. The ozone layer would be damaged further and the polar
regions would suffer. In addition, space travel is only really a possibility for the super-rich.
Although Virgin Galactic claims to be 'opening space to the rest of us', there are still millions of
people worldwide who wouldn't be able to afford it.
1. What is space tourism?
2. Who are futurologists?
3. What were the predictions on space after the first man landed on the moon in 1969?
4. Have the predictions made by futurologists come true? Explain why.
67
5. How has a trip to space become possible?
6. What kind of space travel is the most affordable?
7. Describe a possible travel to space.
8. How could space tourism affect the environment?
9. In your opinion, is space tourism affordable to all people? What might be a hindrance?
10. Describe the attitude of the author towards space tourism.
Referencehttp://learnenglishteens.britishcouncil.org/magazine/science-and-technology/what-spacetourism
Descriptor A learner
 answers to the questions.
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TERM 4
Unit 8. Different ways of living
Subunit Discussing whether money brings happiness
Learning objective 10.1.3 Respect differing points of view
10.2.8 Recognize inconsistencies in argument in extended talk on
a range of general and curricular subjects;
10.3.3 Explain and justify their own and others’ point of view on
a range of general and curricular topics
Assessment criteria  Listen to others’ opinions and consider them
 Find claim, reasons and evidence in the text to recognise
inconsistencies in argument
 Explain and justify own and others’ point of view on a
wide range of general and curricular topics
Level of thinking skills Knowledge and comprehension
Higher order thinking skills
Task 1. Listen to the recording (https://breakingnewsenglish.com/1604/160411-money-happinessl.html ) and identify whether the statements below are True / False / Not given
1. According to the Beatle’s song it is possible to buy love. _____
2. Few people believe that money cannot buy happiness. _____
3. A new research found out that money enables to buy happiness. _____
4. Researchers interviewed bank customers on the ways of saving money. _____
5. The researchers examined how bank customers spent their money and compared it with
their personalities. _____
6. According to the one from the research team, if people spend money on the things they
like, then they become happier. _____
7. The other researcher believes that there is no connection between spending money and
people’s happiness. _____
8. Also this researcher thinks that spending money to express oneself is not as important as
to well-being as making good friends, for example. _____
Task 2. In pairs, discuss the expressions from the listening activity: “money is the root of all evil”.
Show your agreement/disagreement with your peer’s opinion. Justify your point of view.
Answer keys:
1. False
2. False
3. True
4. Not given
5. True
6. True
7. Not given
8. False
Reference: https://breakingnewsenglish.com/1604/160411-money-happiness-l.html
Transcript
69
A song from the famous English pop group the Beatles told us that money can't buy us love. Many
people also believe that money cannot buy happiness. In fact, there is an expression that says
'money is the root of all evil'. However, a new study from Cambridge University suggests that
money can buy you happiness. Researchers conducted a study on the spending habits of customers
in a bank. They compared what the bank customers bought with their personality. The research
team compared the personalities of 625 people with a list of how they spent their money. The
conclusion of the study was that what people buy can lead to happiness, but only if they buy the
right things.
One of the researchers believes the study may change the way people think about money and
happiness. He said it showed, "that spending can increase our happiness when it is spent on goods
and services that fit our personalities". He said Internet companies could use information about
people's happiness to recommend products and services that make people happier. Another
researcher said spending money could be more important in our lives than we thought. She said:
"Spending money on products that help us express who we are as individuals could turn out to be
as important to our well-being as finding the right job, the right neighbourhood or even the right
friends and partners."
Descriptor A learner
Task 1  identifies whether the statements are true/false/not given answers
open-ended questions;
Task 2  expresses own opinion on the expression;
 analyzes a peer’s point of the view;
 explains why he/she agrees or disagrees with his/her peer.
70
Unit 8. Different ways of living
Subunit Discussing whether money brings happiness
Learning objective 10.4.1 Understand main points in extended texts on a range of
familiar and some unfamiliar general and curricular topics
Assessment criteria  Recognize the main idea in extended texts
Level of thinking skills Knowledge and comprehension
Task 1. Read the text below about money and happiness and for questions, 1-5 choose answers A,
B or C. There is only one correct answer for each question.
All in all, it was probably a mistake to look for the answer to the eternal question- “Does money
buy happiness” – from people who practice what’s called the dismal science. For when economists
tackled the question, they started from the observation that when people put something up for sale
they try to get as much for it as they can get, and when people buy something they try to pay as
little for it as they can. Both sides in the transaction, the economists noticed, are therefore
behaving as if they would be happier, they wound up receiving more money or holding on to more
money. Hence, more money must be better than less of it is if it brings your greater contentment.
The economists’ conclusion: the more money you have, the happier you must be.
“Psychologists have spent decades studying the relation between wealth and happiness”, writes
Harvard University psychologist Daniel Gilbert in his best-selling “Stumbling on Happiness”, and
they have generally concluded that wealth increases human happiness when it lifts people out of
abject poverty and into the middle class, but that it does little to increase happiness thereafter.
In a typical survey people are asked to rank their sense of well-being or happiness on a scale from
1 to 7, where 1 means “not at all satisfied with my life” and 7 means “completely satisfied”. Of the
American multimillionaires who responded, the average happiness score was 5.8. Homeless people
in Calcutta came in at 2.9. But before you assume that money does buy happiness after all,
consider who else rated themselves around 5.8: the Inuit of northern Greenland, who do not
exactly lead a life of luxury, and the cattle-herding Masai of Kenya, whose dung huts have no
electricity or running water. And proving Gilbert’s point about money buying happiness only
when it lifts you out of abject poverty, slum dwellers in Calcutta – one economic rung above the
homeless – rate themselves at 4.6.
1. How did economists examine the relation of money to happiness?
A. They interviewed people in the streets on their attitude towards money and
happiness
B. They observed that when people sell something, they try to gain more money and
when buying, people try to spend less money
C. They examined how people manage their money (savings and spending)
2. More money must be better because:
A. It enables people buying whatever they want
B. It makes travelling affordable
C. It brings more happiness and satisfaction
3. According to Daniel Gilbert, how does money make people happier?
A. People do not live in poor conditions
B. People can buy different things
C. People receive high salaries
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4. According to the survey, who rated themselves as being happy?
A. Inuit of Northern Greenland
B. American multimillionaires
C. Homeless people in Calcutta
5. What does a house of Masai of Kenya lack?
A. Heating
B. Hot water
C. Electricity
Task 2. Answer the following questions.
6. What is the main idea of the text?
7. Why having more money is better according to economists’ conclusions?
8. What is the work of Daniel Gilbert?
9. What kind of people participated in the survey?
10. According to the text, what are the living conditions of Masai of Kenya?
Answer keys:
1. B
2. C
3. A
4. B
5. C
6. The main idea of the text is about the question whether money brings happiness.
7. According to economists conclusions, the more money people have, the happier they are.
8. Daniel Gilbert wrote a best-selling “Stumbling on Happiness”.
9. Different kind of people such as American millionaires, homeless people of Calcutta, the
Inuit of Northern Greenland and cattle-herding Masai of Kenya.
10. He lives in a dung hut which has no electricity and running water.
Reference https://www.newsweek.com/money-happiness-103971
Descriptor A learner
Task 1  answers multiple-choice questions;
Task 2  identify the main idea;
 answer open-ended question.
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Unit 8. Different ways of living
Subunit Discussing whether money brings happiness
Learning objective 10.4.1 Understand main points in extended texts on a wide range
of familiar and some unfamiliar general and curricular
topics
Assessment criteria  Identify main points in extended texts
Level of thinking skills Knowledge and comprehension
Task. Read the text and complete the table below.
What Does a Million Dollars Buy?
When asked the question “What would you do with a million dollars?” most people tend to
give similar answers: “Quit my job”, “Buy my dream house” or “Go traveling”. People often think
that having a million dollars would make all their dreams come true. In reality, a million dollars
may not really be that much money. Twenty years ago, it might have been possible to fulfill these
dreams. However, things are not so easy today.
In most industrialized countries, prices for everything from food to transport to university
fees have steadily increased over the years. Housing prices in particular have risen greatly. The
main reason is that the population has increased—becoming very dense in certain areas—but there
are fewer homes available for sale or rent. For example, in the U.S., the average price of a new
home in 1990 was $149,800. The average price in 2010 was $272,900. With increases like that,
you can see why owning property is considered a good long-term investment.
Housing in city centers also costs more than ever before. People used to move from the city
center to the outer city neighborhoods or suburbs to escape overcrowding and noise. Today, many
are moving back because they want to be closer to their workplace. Since space is limited in these
areas, supply has not caught up with rising demand, and prices have gone up a result. For example,
it is nearly impossible to find a place in London’s expensive Mayfair district, or Manhattan in New
York City, for a million dollars. Even countries that traditionally have a lower cost of living, like
India or Brazil, have seen property prices rise dramatically. A 2,000 square foot (186 square meter)
apartment in Mumbai’s southern neighborhoods can cost more than $3 million—the same as a
two-bedroom flat in central London.
Cause Effect
1 The population is more dense, but there are
fewer homes available.
Housing has become very expensive.
2 People started moving to the suburbs.
3 People want to be closer to their workplace.
4 We need more money to buy things.
5 Many older people are living longer.
Reference
https://ngl.cengage.com/assets/downloads/asr_pro0000000020/active_level_3_unit_4.pdf
Descriptor A learner
 completes the table.
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Unit 8. Different ways of living
Subunit Discussing whether money brings happiness
Learning objective 10.3.3 Explain and justify own and others’ point of view on a wide
range of general and curricular topics
Assessment criteria  Explain and justify own and others’ point of view
Level of thinking skills Higher order thinking skills
Task. Choose one quote and make a three-minute speech sharing your idea.
- Analyze the quote
- Create a speech
- State whether you agree or disagree with the saying
- Use topical vocabulary (at least 5 words)
- Use body language effectively (posture, gestures, para-language, facial expression)
1. “A wise person should have money in their head, not in their heart”. (Jonathan Swift)
2. “Old-fashioned people think you can have a soul without money. They think the less
money you have, the more soul you have. Young people nowadays know better. A soul is a
very expensive thing to keep: much more so than a motor car.” (George Bernard Shaw)
3. “They say money doesn’t bring happiness, but everyone still wants to prove it for
themselves” (author unknown)
4. “Money is not synonym of happiness, but life is rough and tough without money” (Dr. T.
P. Chia)
5. “You aren’t wealthy until you have something money can’t buy” (Garth Brooks)
6. “Money is numbers and numbers never end. If it takes money to be happy, your
search for happiness will never end” (Bob Marley)
7. “People who say that money can’t buy happiness, have apparently never used money”
(author unknown)
8. “There are people so poor, that the only thing they have is money” (Patrick Meagher)
9. “If you want to feel rich just count the things you have that money can’t buy” (author
unknown)
10. “It is not how much we have, but how much we enjoy, that makes happiness”
(Charles Spurgeon)
Descriptor A learner
Task 1  analyzes the quote;
 creates a speech;
 states whether agree or disagree with the saying;
 uses topical vocabulary;
 uses body language effectively.
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Unit 8. Different ways of living
Subunit Discussing whether money brings happiness
Learning objective 10.6.13 Use a growing variety of past modal forms including
must have, can’t have, might have to express speculation
and deduction about the past on a wide range of familiar
general and curricular topics
Assessment criteria  Use a growing variety of past modal forms
Level of thinking skills Application
Task 1. Complete the sentences using past modal forms to express deduction about the past: must
have / can’t have / might have + V3 (ed)
Example: Susan left a highly paid and successful job. She must have had a reason for doing that.
My mom stepped down from a long career as a school principal. She__________________
Mary moved from a big city to countryside. She __________________________________
The Browns left their house in NY and moved to a rural area. They ___________________
Ann’s boss insisted on her staying in a company, but she refused. She _________________
Jem became self-employed. He _______________________________________________
Task 2. Create 5 examples with using modals in the past to express deduction.
Descriptor A learner
Task 1  uses modal form in the past (must have, can’t have, might have) to
express deduction about the past;
Task 2  creates own examples (5 sentences).
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Unit 8. Different ways of living
Subunit Discussing whether money brings happiness
Learning objective 10.2.4 Understand implied meaning in unsupported extended talk
on a wide range of general and curricular topics, including
talk on a limited range of unfamiliar topics
Assessment criteria  Recognize most of the implied meaning in the talk while
listening
Level of thinking skills Knowledge and comprehension
Task 1. Listen to the study report examining what makes people happier. Look at the statements
and circle the correct answer. http://www.saberingles.com.ar/listening/224.html
1. Harvard University researchers together with University of South Florida
found out what makes people happier.
True / False
2. The study was based on the emotional health of the participants. True / False
3. The research was carried out from 1983 to 2003. True / False
4. The Framingham Heart Study began right after the study on people’s
happiness.
True / False
5. The results of the study show that people affect each other’s happiness
when live close.
True / False
6. There is little evidence that happy neighbors make an effect on others’
happiness.
True / False
7. Sadness and happiness spread among friends equally. True / False
8. The research found out that money has less effect on peoples’ happiness
than three degrees of separation.
True / False
9. Friends influence people’s happiness the most according to the study. True / False
10. The findings of the research were not published. True / False
Task 2. Based on the listening activity and own experience, think of your indicators of happiness
and rate them from 1 as the least impactful to 5 as the strongest one.
Answer keys:
Task 1
1. False
2. True
3. True
4. False
5. True
6. False
7. False
8. True
9. True
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10. False
Reference http://www.saberingles.com.ar/listening/224.html
Recording as attached (Term 4_Unit 8_10.2.4_Money Happiness)
Transcript
This is the VOA Special English Health Report.
What makes people happier: money or having happy friends and neighbors? Researchers from
Harvard University and the University of California, San Diego, have found an answer as part of a
study.
Nicholas Christakis and James Fowler based the study on the emotional health of almost five
thousand people. They used information gathered over a period of twenty years, until two thousand
three, in the Framingham Heart Study. That study began sixty years ago in Framingham,
Massachusetts, to learn more about the risks of heart attack and stroke.
The new study found that friends of happy people had a greater chance of being happy themselves.
And the smaller the physical distance between friends, the larger the effect they had on each
other's happiness.
For example, a person was twenty percent more likely to feel happy if a friend living within one
and a half kilometers was also happy. Having a happy neighbor who lived next door increased an
individual's chance of being happy by thirty-four percent. The effects of friends' happiness lasted
for up to a year.
The researchers found that happiness really is contagious. Sadness also spread among friends, but
not as much as happiness.
People removed by as much as three degrees of separation still had an effect on a person's
happiness. Three degrees of separation means the friend of a friend of a friend.
The study showed that having an extra five thousand dollars increased a person's chances of
becoming happier by about two percent. But the researchers found that the influence of a friend of
a friend of a friend can be greater than that.
Another finding is that people who are married or work together do not have as much of an effect
on happiness as friends do.
The findings appeared in the British Medical Journal. The National Institute on Aging in the
United States helped pay for the study.
Descriptor A learner
Task 1  analyzes the statements;
 identifies True/False information;
Task 2  rates indicators of happiness from 1 to 5.
77
Unit 8. Different ways of living
Subunit Evaluating the benefits of living without money
Learning objective 10.1.1 Use speaking and listening skills to solve problems
creatively and cooperatively in groups
10.6.6 Use a wide variety of relative, demonstrative, indefinite,
quantitative]of pronouns and reflexive pronoun structures
on a wide range of familiar general and curricular topics
Assessment criteria  Discuss a problem in groups and suggest a solution for a
problem
 Use a wide variety of pronouns and reflexive pronoun
structures
Level of thinking skills Application
Higher order thinking skills
Task 1. Read the text “My life without money”. Fill in the table with the examples of pronouns
from the text.
My life without money
Heidamarie Schwermer, a German woman, has lived without money for last ten years, and
has written a book about her experiences called “My life without money”.
It all began as a one-year experiment. In her home city of Dortmund she set up a “swapping
circle” where people swap services without using money, for example, a haircut for a mathematics
class. To prove that this could work she decided to give up using money for a year. But when the
year ended, she continued and has not used money since then.
At first she house-sat for friends who were on holiday. She stayed in their house in return for
watering the plants and looking after their animals. At the moment she is staying in a student
residence where she can sleep, have a shower, or use a computer in return for cooking for the
young people who live there. She also “works” as a psychotherapist. “Before I treated very
wealthy people, but now I help anyone who turns up. Sometimes they give me something in return,
but not always”.
Heidemarie says, “I can live thanks to my contacts. A lot of people who know me understand
what I’m doing and want to help me. When I need a bus ticket, for example, or a new tube of
toothpaste I think, Who can I ask? What I can give them in return?” If I want to go to the ci nema, I
might offer to look after somebody’s children for the afternoon. It is one of the mistakes of our
society that most people do something they don’t like just to earn money and spend it on things
they don’t need. Many people judge you according to ho w much you earn. In my opinion, all jobs
are equally important. You may not earn a lot of money but you may be worth a lot as a person.
That’s my message”.
So what did she do with all the money she earned from the sales of “My life without
money”?
“I gave it all away…”
Types of pronouns Examples from the text
Personal
Indefinite
Demonstrative
Interrogative
Relative
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Task 2. Create your own examples of using pronouns. For each type make 2 sentences.
Task 3. Work in groups of 3. Think of the ways of living without money for a year. Discuss your
ideas as a class.
Answer keys:
Personal pronouns: her, it, she, their, I, they, me, you.
Indefinite pronouns: anyone, something, somebody’s
Demonstrative pronouns: that, this
Interrogative pronouns: who, what, how
Relative pronouns: where, who
Reference http://lingualeo.com/ru/jungle/my-life-without-money-383649#/page/1
Descriptor A learner
Task 1  classifies types of pronouns;
Task 2  creates own examples with 5 types of pronouns;
Task 3  discusses the possible solutions to the problem;
 finds the solutions;
 presents ideas to the class.
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Unit 8. Different ways of living
Subunit Evaluating the benefits of living without money
Learning objective 10.5.3 Write with grammatical accuracy on a range of familiar
general and curricular topics
10.6.2 Use a variety of quantifiers for countable and uncountable
nouns and a variety of noun phrases on a wide range of
familiar general and curricular topics
10.6.4 Use a wide variety of determiners and pre-determiner
structures on a wide range of familiar general and curricular
topics on a wide range of familiar general and curricular
topics
Assessment criteria  Demonstrate the ability to write grammatically correct
sentences on familiar topics
 Apply a variety of quantifiers for countable and uncountable
nouns and a variety of noun phrases
 Use a wide variety of determiners and pre-determiner
structures
Level of thinking skills Application
Task. Imagine you are making an experiment of living without money for a month. Describe your
experience using a variety of quantifiers (several, plenty, a large/small number/amount, a great deal
of, none), determiners (definite/indefinite articles, pronouns, quantifiers) and pre-determiner
structures (such, what, rather, quite). Write 100-120 words.
Describe:
 Where you are living
 How you earn for life
 How do you feel living without money
Assessment criteria: Learners may share their experiences on living without money as a blog entry
and post it, or submit their papers to teacher.
Descriptor A learner
Task  creates a story;
 uses a wide variety of determiners and pre-determiner structures;
 use the correct quantifiers including several, plenty, a large/small
number/amount, a great deal of, none.
80
Unit 8. Different ways of living
Subunit Exploring the concept of downshifting
Learning objective 10.1.8 Develop intercultural awareness through reading and
discussion
10.4.3 Skim a range of lengthy texts with speed to identify
content meriting closer reading on a range of general and
curricular topics
Assessment criteria  Raise awareness about cultural diversity through reading
 Skim the text to identify the main idea
Level of thinking skills Knowledge and comprehension
Application
Task. Read the texts below and match them with the type of downshifting. For each text there is
only one possible answer.
There are five types of downshifters according to Amy Salzman.
A. Urban Escapees
B. Career Shifters
C. Back-Trackers
D. Self-Employers
E. Plateauers
1)______________________
… actively choose self-demotion or self-firing in order to pursue other goals or open more
time for family. For example, one of my best friends left a highly successful 18 year corporate
career and became a stay-at-home dad when their first child arrived. My mother stepped down
from a long career as an elementary school teacher and became the most overqualified teacher’s
aide in the Albany school district.
2)_______________________
… don’t self-demote, but rather choose to stay in place by turning down promotions and
opportunities for advancement.
I was department chair several years ago and filled in as temporary chair last semester and
both times was happy to leave this position of more responsibility, prestige and money to return to
faculty status. I did this despite the fact that many, including my bosses and those in upper
leadership, encouraged me to stay on even consider higher positions in the future.
3) ________________________
… make a seemingly small change to their career trajectory or employer that often makes a
huge difference in lifestyle as opposed to moving to an entirely different career (so lawyer-turnednovelist doesn’t count, but a lawyer-turned-mediator would).
Shifting careers is more common than you’d think. Many accountants at Big 4 firms escape
their intense work pressures and time demands by taking internal accounting positions at client
companies.
4) ________________________
Many people choose to get off a corporate track and go into business for themselves. This
process isn’t easy, and involves a lot of financial risk. But if you become your own boss without
letting your business take over your life, self-employment can give you the autonomy to lead a
better work-life balance.
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5) ________________________
The cost of living in the orbit of large affluent coastal US cities pretty much precludes
downshifting. Many people who can work remotely or shifted their careers to be more flexible,
chose to move out of the city to where the lifestyle is slower and more affordable. Moving out of
the city and taking a similar but less stressful/lower paying job in a more affordable area also be a
financial net positive.
Answer keys:
1. C
2. E
3. B
4. D
5. A
Reference http://fathersworkandfamily.com/2013/07/15/downshifting-5-ways-to-slow-down-yourcareer-for-family/
Descriptor A learner
 categorizes the texts with types of downshifters.
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Unit 8. Different ways of living
Subunit Exploring the concept of downshifting
Learning objective 10.2.5 Recognize the attitude or opinion of the speaker(s) in
unsupported extended talk on a wide range of general and
curricular topics, including talk on a limited range of
unfamiliar topics
Assessment criteria  Identify the position of speakers in an extended talk with
some support
Level of thinking skills Knowledge and comprehension
Task 1. Listen to six people sharing their ideas on living in a city or countryside. Define whether
speakers’ opinions are True or False.
Link: http://www.elllo.org/english/Mixer001/T005-City.html
Speaker 1 likes living in cities and going to different places, but doesn’t like when it is
crowded.
T/F
Speaker 2 wants to have houses both in a city and country, and spend weekends in the
country.
T/F
Speaker 3 has lived in such cities as Tokyo, Bangkok and Los Angeles. He also has
experienced living in a country, but prefers cities more.
T/F
Speaker 4 lived in countryside and finds life there not interesting. T/F
Speaker 5 thinks that pace of life in a city is quite fast and everyone is in a hurry. T/F
Speaker 6 finds life in a city more attractive as city offers many places to go. T/F
Answer keys:
Speaker 1 False
Speaker 2 True
Speaker 3 False
Speaker 4 True
Speaker 5 True
Speaker 6 True
Reference http://fathersworkandfamily.com/2013/07/15/downshifting-5-ways-to-slow-down-yourcareer-for-family/
Transcript
Jeyong, Korea
I like living in cities more than the country because I like the crowdedness of people all busy
walking around and especially like going to clubs, being with many people and talking to new
people is something that I live very much.
Al, England
I think ideally I'd like to do both, so have, be rich and have a house in the country and and a house
in the city and spend my weekdays in the country, in a stone house, and go to the city on weekends
and party.
Joel, America
Well, I've lived in very big cities for most of my life: Tokyo, Bangkok, Los Angeles, and now is
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the first time ever that I've lived in the country and I'm finding that I like it a lot better. I have time
to do things that I could never do in the city, like play guitar or even read the news, and I'm
enjoying a peaceful lifestyle a lot more than the busy city life.
Martin, United States
If I wanted to live in the city or country, I'd have to say nowadays, in the city. I grew up in the
country in a very small farm and it was kind of boring. I enjoyed the clean air and
the wildlife around but it was boring. The city is much more exciting and a lot more to do and see
and experience, so by and large, the city for me is the way to go.
Mitchell, United States
I would rather live in the countryside because I'm from the islands and everything is more
peaceful, relax, and time seems to go by slowly. Compared to the city, it seems like every one is in
a rush, moving around fast, trying to get things done as soon as possible, that's why I'd rather live
in the countryside.
Shuan, Canada
I think that living in the city would be so much better than living in the country. I like being active,
and I like going out so living in the country would be, I would think, boring, compared to the city.
Descriptor A learner
 identifies whether speakers’ opinions are True or False.
84
Unit 8. Different ways of living
Subunit Exploring the concept of downshifting
Learning objective 10.5.1 Plan, write, edit and proofread work at text level
independently on a range of general and curricular topics
10.5.5 Develop with support coherent arguments supported when
necessary by examples and reasons for a wide range of
written genres in familiar general and curricular topics
Assessment criteria  Plan, write, edit and write a final draft
 Designate a clear position on an issue and outline coherent
arguments by stating claims, choosing evidence to support
their answer
Level of thinking skills Application
Higher order thinking skills
Task. Some people think that cities are best places to live. Others prefer to live in the rural area.
Write an essay stating your opinion which place is better to live in.
- Explain advantages of living in a city / rural area
- Divide your ideas into logical paragraphs
- Develop arguments by providing further explanation and examples
- Follow the structure of essay
- Use linking words
- Use topical vocabulary
Descriptor A learner
Task  follows the structure of essay (introduction, body, conclusion);
 develops arguments by providing further explanation and examples;
 uses linking words;
 uses topical vocabulary.
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Unit 8. Different ways of living
Subunit Exploring the concept of downshifting
Learning objective 10.5.2 Write independently about factual and imaginary past and
future events, activities and experiences on a wide range of
familiar general and curricular topics
10.6.10 Use present continuous and past continuous active and
passive forms on a wide range of general and familiar
curricular topics
10.6.15 Use infinitive forms after an increased number of verbs
and adjectives; use gerund forms after a variety of verbs
and prepositions; use a variety of prepositional and phrasal
verb on a wide range of familiar general and curricular
topics
Assessment criteria  Write about real and imaginary past events using a variety
of simple past and present perfect forms
 Show the ability to use past continuous, present continuous
forms for present and future meaning
 Apply the rule for the usage of infinitive and gerund forms
after a limited variety of verbs and prepositions; use
prepositional and phrasal verbs
Level of thinking skills Application
Task. You are a young man who decided to quit his job and moved to a village. In your diary,
write at least 2 entries on the following stages of your life far from city:
1) Considering why to move to a rural area
2) Discussing the issue with your family and friends
3) Describing your experience and feeling
4) Reflecting on your new life
In your writing
Use:
- past and present continuous tenses (active/passive forms);
- gerund and infinitive forms;
- prepositional and phrasal verbs.
-
Describe:
- Where you are living
- How you earn for life
- How do you feel living without money
Descriptor A learner
 writes at least 2 diary entries;
 meets the requirements of diary entry;
 uses appropriate style taking into account the purpose, audience and
the context;
 uses past and present continuous tenses (active/passive forms);
 uses gerund and infinitive forms;
86
 uses prepositional and phrasal verbs;
 describes feelings;
 reflects on his/her experience by analyzing the benefits of living in a
rural area.
87
Unit 9. Independent Project
Subunit Planning a sustainable city of the future
Learning objective 10.4.4 Read a wide range of extended fiction and non-fiction
texts on familiar and unfamiliar general and curricular
topics
10.5.8 Communicate and respond to news and feelings in
correspondence through a variety of functions on a range
of general and curricular topics
Assessment criteria  Skim and scan the extended fiction or non-fiction texts to
identify the general information
 Communicate and respond to news and feelings in
correspondence
Level of thinking skills Knowledge and comprehension
Application
Task. Read the article about eco-friendly cities and take notes. In pairs, create a leaflet advertising
an imaginary eco-friendly city in Kazakhstan.
A leaflet should include the following information:
- Name of the city
- At least 3 indicators of a sustainable city
- Its population
- Places
Descriptors for structure of a leaflet:
- Make no or few grammar mistakes
- Use complex sentence structures
- Organize ideas coherently (3 linking devices)
- Use short paragraphs, lists, tables, etc. with bullet points, stars, etc. to separate information
- Tone must be informative
Four Kazakh Cities Join UNDP-GEF Sustainable Cities Project
Source: Astana Times
The akims (mayors) of Taraz, Shymkent, Temirtau and Lisakovsk cities of Kazakhstan
officially signed memoranda of understanding with the UNDP-Global Environmental Facility
(GEF) project Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) for Low -Carbon Urban
Development at a UNDP-sponsored conference in Astana Nov. 5.
“Sustainable cities means planning, designing and construction with the aim to reduce the
impact on the environment, reduce air pollution and reduce greenhouse gas emissions,” said
Director of the Energy Conservation Department of the Industrial Committee of Development and
Safety of Kazakhstan’s Ministry of Investment and Development Olzhas Alibekov addressing the
conference. He also noted that, given low oil prices and the overall challenging economic
environment, the timing is especially good for working on a new platform from which to attract
new, energy-efficient and environmentally friendly technology to Kazakhstan.
The project, also called the Sustainable Cities Project, aims to collect 11 cities in total for
its pilot programme in Kazakhstan and intends to support the cities as they identify, design and
implement NAMAs to guide their development. The NAMAs are expected to take the form of
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investments in infrastructure supported by capacity building, awareness raising and technical
assistance, according to the UNDP. The $71.3 million project, financed mostly by the government
of Kazakhstan with contributions from the UNDP, GEF and other sources, is to help cities carry
out integrated municipal planning, create NAMAs and decide on priorities, create and strengthen
local institutions and facilitate financing for urban projects by creating funding mechanisms,
according to the UNDP.
The project is the first effort in Kazakhstan to adopt a comprehensive approach to reduce
GHG emissions in cities, which project organisers note are among the world’s most GHGintensive.
Following the plenary session and the signing ceremony, participants took part in sessions
on financing for low-carbon development, best practices in urban sustainability in Central Asia and
the world and field visits to low-carbon initiatives around Astana.
Reference https://www.kazakhembus.com/content/four-kazakh-cities-join-undp-gef-sustainablecities-project
Descriptor A learner
 creates a leaflet, including name of the city, at least 3 indicators of a
sustainable city, its population and places;
 makes no or few grammar mistakes;
 uses complex sentence structures;
 organizes ideas coherently (3 linking devices);
 uses short paragraphs, lists, tables, etc. with bullet points, stars, etc. to
separate information.
89
Unit 9. Independent Project
Subunit Planning a sustainable city of the future
Learning objective 10.3.7 Use appropriate subject-specific vocabulary and syntax to
talk about a range of general and curricular topics
10.6.8 Use a variety of future active and passive and future
continuous forms on a wide range of familiar general and
curricular topics
Assessment criteria  Talk about given topics using appropriate syntax and topic
related vocabulary
 Use of future active and passive and future continuous
forms for future events
Level of thinking skills Application
Task. Create a persuasive public speech on one of the following topics:
- Money can’t buy happiness (this is related to unit “Different ways of living”)
- Things are not always bad as they seem (this is related to unit “Stress and Fear”)
- Imagination can lead to innovation (this is related to unit “Imagination and Creativity”)
- Space research should be funded (this is related to unit “Out of this world”)
- “Video games and computers have become babysitters for kids” (Taylor Kitsch) (this is
related to unit “Virtual World”)
- “Legend remains victorious in spite of history” (Sarah Bernhardt) (this is related to unit
“Legend or Truth”)
- “Gender equality is not a woman’s issue. It is a human issue. It affects us all” (this is
related to unit “Controversial Issues”)
Stages:
1. Learners study what effective strategies of public speech are. They need to search for
information and take notes, then share in class.
2. Teacher introduces non-verbal communication and learner practice in class: posture,
gestures, paralanguage, and facial expressions).
3. Learners revise stylistic devices (metaphor, personification, hyperbole, simile, allusion,
etc).
4. Teacher introduces a rhetorical triangle: ethos, logos and pathos. Learners choose one to
build their speech on.
5. Leaners work on creating their speech: outline of speech.
6. In class learners present their public speech to persuade peers on one of the topics and call
for action.
7. Teacher gives feedback.
Descriptor A learner
 creates a persuasive speech;
 uses topical vocabulary;
 uses future forms;
 uses complex sentence structures.

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