» » СОР И СОЧ Specification of Summative Assessment for term on the subject «The English language» Grade 10 (social-humanitarian direction)

СОР И СОЧ Specification of Summative Assessment for term on the subject «The English language» Grade 10 (social-humanitarian direction)

30 август 2019, Пятница
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Specification of Summative Assessment for term
on the subject «The English language»
Grade 10
(social-humanitarian direction)
Nur-Sultan, 2019
2
CONTENTS
1. Aim of the Summative Assessment for term ................................................................................ 3
2. The document defining the content of the Summative Assessment for term ............................... 3
3. Expected outcomes on the subject «The English language», Grade 10 ....................................... 3
4. Level of thinking skills on the subject of «The English language», Grade 10 ............................. 4
5. Administration rules ..................................................................................................................... 5
6. Moderation and marking ............................................................................................................... 6
SPECIFICATION OF SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT FOR TERM 1 ....................................... 7
SPECIFICATION OF SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT FOR TERM 2 ..................................... 20
SPECIFICATION OF SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT FOR TERM 3 ..................................... 33
SPECIFICATION OF SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT FOR TERM 4 ..................................... 46
3
1. Aim of the Summative Assessment for term
Summative assessment (SA) is aimed to assess learners’ success in terms of the learning
objectives achievement and reveal their level of knowledge and skills acquired during the term
within the framework of updating the upper secondary education content.
Specification describes the content and procedure for the delivery of the Summative
Assessment for term in «The English language» in Grade 10.
2. The document defining the content of the Summative Assessment for term
Subject Programme for «The English language» for 10-11 grades of upper secondary
education of the Social-Humanitarian direction on the updated content.
3. Expected outcomes on the subject «The English language», Grade 10
Listening
A learner understands the main ideas of authentic texts of a range of genres, conversations on
familiar and partially unfamiliar topics; recognises functionally important meanings, including
details and specific information to fill in forms, tables, schemes; understands the meaning of terms
and the key units of texts on a range of curricular topics and general topics; distinguishes between a
fact and an opinion; recognises and compares inconsistencies in medium-length texts of a range of
genres and styles on general and curricular topics; deduces the meanings of unfamiliar words using
the context.
Speaking
A learner participates in a conversation in situations of formal and informal everyday
communication; correctly formulates utterances using the lexical and grammatical resources of the
language; expresses an emotional and evaluative attitude to the reality using a previously suggested
strategy of oral communication; analyses and compares texts providing arguments to support their
point of view; reasons evaluating events, opinions, and problems; makes conclusions and suggests
ways to solve a given problem.
Reading
A learner understands the main ideas of fiction and non-fiction texts on familiar and
unfamiliar general and curricular topics; uses a range of reading strategies; identifies the time and
cause-effect connections of events and phenomena; checks and extends the meanings of words
using paper and digital resources; critically evaluates the content of texts of a range of familiar
general and curricular topics, and some unfamiliar topics.
Writing
A learner plans and makes a brief outline of a written text, edits and proofreads texts of a
range of genres and styles; observes spelling and grammar rules; provides arguments in a written
text; writes discursive texts expressing an opinion of an issue; writes business letters and other
documents; writes essays on a range of familiar general and curricular topics, including those on
Humanities.
4
4. Level of thinking skills on the subject of «The English language», Grade 10
Strand
Level of thinking
skills
Description
Recommended
type of
question
Listening
Knowledge and
comprehension
Recognise the main points in
unsupported extended talk;
identify specific information in
unsupported extended talk;
recognise the detail of an argument in
unsupported extended talk;
Questions with
multiple choice
answers.
Questions that
require short
answer.
Questions that
require an
extended
answer.
Higher order
thinking skills
deduce meaning from context in
unsupported extended talk;
recognise speaker viewpoints and
extent of explicit agreement between
speakers;
Speaking
Application use formal and informal language
registers in talk;
use appropriate subject-specific
vocabulary and syntax;
Questions that
require an
extended
answer.
Higher order
thinking skills
ask and respond to complex questions
to get information about a wide range of
general and curricular topics;
explain and justify own and others’
point of view;
evaluate and comment on the views of
others in a growing variety of talk
contexts;
interact with peers to make
hypotheses about a wide range of general
and curricular topics;
navigate talk and modify language
through paraphrase and correction in talk;
Reading
Knowledge and
comprehension
recognise main points in extended
texts;
identify specific information and
detail in extended texts;
Questions with
multiple choice
answers.
Questions that
require short
answer.
Questions that
require an
extended
answer.
Higher order
thinking skills
deduce meaning from context in
extended texts;
recognise the attitude or opinion of the
writer in extended texts;
recognise patterns of development in
lengthy texts [inter-paragraph level];
recognise inconsistencies in argument
in extended texts;
5
Writing
Application use a growing range of vocabulary,
which is appropriate to topic and genre,
and which is spelt accurately;
write with grammatical accuracy;
use style and register to achieve
appropriate degree of formality in a
growing variety of written genres;
write coherently at text level using a
variety of connectors;
Questions that
require an
extended
answer.
Higher order
thinking skills
use independently appropriate layout at
text level on a range of general and
curricular topics;
Use of
English
Application use a variety of quantifiers for
countable and uncountable nouns and a
variety of noun phrases;
use a variety of compound adjectives,
adjectives as participles, comparative
structures indicating degree, and
intensifying adjectives;
use perfect continuous forms and a
variety of simple perfect active and
passive forms including time adverbials
… so far, lately, all my life;
use a variety of future active and
passive and future continuous forms;
use a variety of reported statements and
question forms;
use infinitive forms after an increased
number of verbs and adjectives use
gerund forms after a variety of verbs and
prepositions
use a variety of prepositional and
phrasal verb;
use a wide variety of conjunctions;
use if / if only in third conditional
structures, use a variety of relative
clauses including with which [whole
previous clause reference].
Questions that
require short
answer.
Questions that
require an
extended
answer.
5. Administration rules
During the Assessment cover all visual materials like, diagrams, schemes, posters and maps
that can serve as prompts for learners.
At the beginning of the Assessment read out the instructions and inform the learners about the
assessment duration. Remind learners that they are not allowed to talk with each other during the
Summative Assessment. After the instructions, make sure they have understood given instructions
and ask if they have any questions before the start of the assessment.
Ensure that learners are working individually and not helping each other. During the
Summative Assessment learners should not have any access to additional recourses that can help
them, for example, dictionaries (excluding the cases when it is allowed in specification).
Recommend learners to cross the wrong answers instead of using an eraser.
6
During the assessment you can answer learners’ questions, regarding the instructions and the
assessment duration. You should not spell, paraphrase or provide any information that could give
the learner an advantage.
Always tell learners that they have 5 minutes left before the end of the Summative
Assessment.
Tell learners to stop writing and put down their pens/pencils on the desks at the end of the
Summative Assessment.
6. Moderation and marking
All teachers use the same version of the mark scheme. During the moderation process it is
necessary to check learner sample papers with the marks awarded to ensure there are no deviations
from the standardised mark scheme.
7
SPECIFICATION OF SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT FOR TERM 1
Review of Summative Assessment for term 1
Duration of the summative assessment for term – 40 minutes
Listening – 10 minutes
Reading – 10 minutes
Writing – 20 minutes
Speaking task is conducted separately.
Total marks - 24
The structure of the summative assessment for term
This sample of Summative Assessment consists of 14 questions: listening, reading, writing
and speaking. Different types of tasks are used in the summative assessment for term.
Listening – multiple choice task on the topic «Legend or Truth?».
Reading – True/False task on the topic «Controversial Issues».
Writing – writing an article on the topics «Legend or Truth?» and «Controversial Issues».
Speaking – making an individual speech on the topics «Legend or Truth?» and «Controversial
Issues».
Transcript for listening task can be found after the mark scheme.
8
Characteristic of tasks for summative assessment for term 1
Unit Strand Learning objective
*Total
number of
questions
*Question

*Type of
question
*Task description Time
Total
marks
Legend or
Truth?
Controversial
Issues
Listening 10.2.2 Understand specific
information in unsupported
extended talk on a wide
range of general and
curricular topics, including
talk on a limited range of
unfamiliar topics
6 1
2
3
4
5
6
Multiplematching
Each learner works
individually.
Learners listen to the interview
«The Hypnotist» twice on the
topic «Legend or Truth?»
having chance to look through
the questions before the
recording starts. The task
consists of 6 questions.
Learners match the halves and
make up meaningful sentences
according to what they hear.
10 minutes 6
Reading 10.4.1 Understand main
points in extended texts on
a wide range of unfamiliar
general and curricular
topics
6 1
2
3
4
5
6
True/False Each learner works
individually.
Learners read an article about
«Growing up equal» on the
topic «Controversial Issues»
and answer questions. This task
consists of 6 questions with one
possible answer. Learners mark
the sentences True or False.
10 minutes 6
Writing 10.5.2 Use a growing range
of vocabulary, which is
appropriate to topic and
genre, and which is spelt
accurately
10.5.4 Use style and register
to achieve appropriate
degree of formality in a
1 1 Writing
an article
Each learner works
individually.
They should write an article
choosing one of the given
topics. They should write with
appropriate style and register
using a variety of topic related
vocabulary and past modal
20 minutes 6
9
growing variety of written
genres on a range of general
and curricular topics
10.6.13 Use a growing
variety of past modal forms
including must have, can’t
have, might have to express
speculation and deduction
about the past on a wide
range of familiar general
and curricular topics
forms to express speculation
and deduction.
Speaking 10.3.1 Use formal and
informal language registers
in talk on a wide range of
general and curricular
topics
10.3.7 Use appropriate
subject-specific vocabulary
and syntax to talk about a
range of general and
curricular topics
10.6.7 Use perfect
continuous forms and a
variety of simple perfect
active and passive forms
including time adverbials
… so far, lately, all my life ,
on a wide range of familiar
general and curricular
topics
1 1 Openended
The speaking task has 8
different cards with 4 open
questions. The questions should
be on the topics «Legend or
Truth?» and «Controversial
Issues». This speaking task is
for individual speech. A learner
should choose one card and
spend 1 minute for preparation
and 2-3 minutes for speaking.
Learners should provide
answers using appropriate
degree of formality, topical
vocabulary and simple perfect
active and passive forms
including time adverbials.
2-3 minutes
for an
individual
6
TOTAL:
40 minutes
(excluding
Speaking)
24
Note: * - sections that can be changed
10
Sample questions and mark scheme
Tasks for the Summative Assessment for term 1
LISTENING
Task. Listen to the recording and match the beginnings of the sentences in the first column (1-6)
with the ends of the sentences in the second column (A-G). There is one sentence half that you DO
NOT NEED TO USE.
Follow the link below to listen to the audio (listen until 2.10).
http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/learningenglish/radio/specials/1728_people_places/page41.shtm
l
1. The process of hypnosis …
2. Andrea states that Paul …
3. Paul McKenna usually considers hypnosis …
4. Paul makes people …
5. Strategic planning is...
6. Reverie is …
A) perform uncommon things.
B) similar to hypnotic trance.
C) influences people differently.
D) visualising the company’s anticipated future.
E) as deep relaxation.
F) focusing on one idea at a time.
G) has an unusual job.
Total [6]
READING
Task. Read the article about gender differences and mark the sentences below True or False.
Growing up equal
Gender stereotypes are rigid ideas about how boys and girls should behave. We all know
what these stereotypes are: A “feminine” girls should be insecure, accommodating and a little
illogical in her thinking. A “masculine” boy should be strong, unemotional, aggressive, and
competitive.
How are children exposed to these stereotypes? According to the researchers David and
Myra Sadker of the American University of Washington, D.C., boys and girls are often treated
differently in the classroom. They found out that when boys speak, teachers usually offer
constructive comments, when girls speech, teachers tend to focus on the behavior. It’s more
important how the girls act rather than what they say.
Blue and Pink
The emphasis on differences begins at birth and continues throughout childhood. For
example, few people would give pink baby’s clothes to a boy or a blue blanket to a girl. Later, many
of us give girls dolls and miniature kitchenware, while boys receive action figures and construction
sets.
There’s nothing wrong with that. The problem arises when certain activities are deemed
appropriate for one sex but not the other.
According to Heather J. Nicholson, Ph.D., director of the National Resource Center for
Girls, Inc., this kind of practice prevents boys and girls from acquiring important skills for their
future lives.
The Sorting Machine
“The fact is,” says Nicholson, “that society functions as a kind of sorting machine regarding
gender. In a recent survey, fifty-eight percent of eighth-grade girls but only six percent of boys
earned money caring for younger children. On the other hand, twenty-seven percent of boys but
only three percent of girls earned money doing lawn work”.
11
If we are serious about educating a generation to be good workers and parents, we need to
eliminate such stereotypes as those mentioned previously.
1. According to the gender stereotypes description, boys lack logic and power. _______ [1]
2. Researchers David and Myra Sadker found that teachers’ attitude towards boys
and girls is equal.
_______ [1]
3. It is all right to give dolls to girls and construction sets to boys. _______ [1]
4. The emphasis on gender differences does not influence the process of getting
essential life skills.
_______ [1]
5. 58% of eight-grade girls and 6% of boys made money taking care of younger
children.
_______ [1]
6. If we get rid of gender stereotypes, there will be a chance to bring up better
parents and employees.
_______ [1]
Total [6]
WRITING
Task. Choose ONE of the topics and write an article.
Topic 1. An international magazine is organising a competition for best articles among school
learners. You have to write an article about a mysterious place in your country that attracts people.
Your article should include the following information:
- what makes it mysterious and/or special;
- the urban legend that lies behind it;
- what you would recommend to visitors of this place.
Topic 2. An international magazine is organising a competition for best articles among school
learners. You have to write an article on how immigration has changed the world. Your article
should include the following information:
- why people choose to immigrate;
- positives and/or negatives of immigration;
- your ideas about how immigration has changed the world.
Total [6]
SPEAKING
Task. Choose ONE of the cards and answer the questions. You have 1 minute to prepare and 2-3
minutes to speak. Pay attention to the formality of your language .Try to use appropriate vocabulary
to talk and perfect tense forms.
Card 1
1. Why is honesty important?
2. Why is it good to be honest?
3. Are there people that you do not trust?
4. What are some common situations when people are sometimes dishonest?
Card 2
1. What do we mean when we say that a person is truthful?
2. How can you tell when someone is not telling you the whole truth?
3. What are some situations when telling a partial truth might be OK?
4. When are times when it might be kinder to tell a partial truth to someone?
12
Card 3
1. Why do so many people believe in supernatural things that can’t be proven?
2. What supernatural beliefs are unique to your culture?
3. What is the scariest ghost story you know?
4. If one of your friends told you they had seen a ghost, would you believe him/her?
Why/Why not?
Card 4
1. Why do you think people need legends?
2. Why do you think urban legends occur?
3. What urban legends are popular in your country?
4. Can you tell at least one of them?
Card 5
1. Beside physical differences, what is different between men and women?
2. Do you think men are better at some things than women? What can they do better?
3. Are women better than men at some things? Which things?
4. Do you have brothers or sisters? What is your relationship with them like?
Card 6
1. Are gender differences mainly because of biology? Or more because of socialisation?
2. In your country, how do the roles of men and women differ in the family?
3. What do you understand by the phrase ‘gender gap’?
4. Would you rather have a male or a female friend? Why?
Card 7
1. Why do people immigrate to other countries?
2. Do you think that immigrants are treated well in most countries?
3. Do you think there is a relation between immigration and crime?
4. Should any government limit the number of immigrants entering the country? What
would be a good number?
Card 8
1. How could local culture be threatened by immigration?
2. How far should immigrants retain their culture?
3. Should immigrants have the same rights as native citizens?
4. Do immigrants have a good or bad reputation in your part of the country?
Total [6]
Total marks____/24
13
Mark scheme
Listening and Reading
Question

Answer Mark
Additional
information
Listening
1
2
3
4
5
6
C 1
G 1
E 1
A 1
D 1
B 1
Reading
1
2
3
4
5
6
False 1 F
False 1 F
True 1 T
False 1 F
True 1 T
True 1 T
Total marks 12
14
Mark scheme
Writing and Speaking
CRITERIA FOR MARKING WRITING
Give a mark out of 6 for each criterion (content, organisation, vocabulary, grammar and punctuation) and then calculate a mean to give an
overall total out of 6. All fractional marks should be rounded up to the closest whole mark.
Mark /
Criterion
Content (relevance and
development of ideas)
Organisation (cohesion,
paragraphing, and format)
Vocabulary (style and
accuracy)
Grammar (style and accuracy)
and Punctuation (accuracy)
6
• All content is relevant to the
task.
• The register completely
corresponds to the requirements
of the task; consistent and
intentional misuse of register*
may indicate a writer’s personal
style.
• All content points are fully
addressed and developed in a
balanced way.
*Such misuse of register should
not harm the format of writing.
• Uses a wide range of
connectors accurately;
referencing is mostly clear.
• Uses paragraphs to separate
ideas; all paragraphs revolve
around one idea or a set of like
ideas; the size of each
paragraph allows for a proper
and balanced development of
ideas.
• The format is appropriate.
• Uses a range of advanced
vocabulary appropriately; uses
less common lexical items with
occasional inappropriacies.
• Has good control of word
formation; may make occasional
errors in producing less common
word forms.
• Spells common vocabulary
items correctly; very few (one or
two) occasional spelling
mistakes may be present.
• May occasionally misspell less
common lexical items.
• Errors in word choice and/or
spelling do not distort meaning.
• Writes simple and compound
sentence forms correctly and
demonstrates variety in length
and complexity.
• Uses complex sentences
accurately, including
punctuation.
• Rare errors in grammar and/or
punctuation.
5
• All content is relevant to the
task; insignificant content
omissions may be present.
• The register on the whole
corresponds to the requirements
of the task; occasional and
inconsistent misuse of register
may be present.
• Most content points are
addressed, but their development
• Uses a range of basic
connectors accurately and
attempts to use more advanced
connectors, but not always
accurately, and referencing, but
not always clearly or
appropriately.
• Uses paragraphs to separate
ideas; most paragraphs revolve
around one idea or a set of like
• Uses a range of everyday
vocabulary appropriately; uses
less common lexical items, but
may make frequent errors.
• Has good control of word
formation; may make errors in
producing less common word
forms.
• Spells common vocabulary
items correctly; few (no more
• Writes simple and compound
sentence forms correctly, but
does not demonstrate variety in
length.
• Occasional errors in grammar
and/or punctuation do not distort
meaning.
15
may be slightly imbalanced. ideas; the size of each
paragraph may reflect
imbalanced development of
ideas.
• The format is appropriate.
than five) occasional spelling
mistakes may be present.
• May often misspell less
common lexical items.
• Errors in word choice and/or
spelling do not distort meaning.
4
• Most content is relevant to the
task; insignificant content
omissions may be present.
• The register on the whole
corresponds to the requirements
of the task.
• Most content points are
addressed, but some content
points may be more fully
covered than others.
• Uses a range of basic
connectors accurately.
• Uses paragraphs to separate
ideas, but tends to misuse
paragraphing (a script is a set
of very short paragraphs or
some paragraphs may be much
longer than other ones for no
apparent reason).
• The format is generally
appropriate.
• Uses everyday vocabulary
generally appropriately, while
occasionally overusing certain
lexical items.
• Has good control of word
formation; can produce common
word forms correctly.
• May make infrequent errors in
spelling more difficult words.
• Errors in word choice and/or
spelling rarely distort meaning.
• Writes simple and some
compound sentence forms
correctly.
• While errors in grammar and/or
punctuation are noticeable,
meaning is rarely distorted.
3
• Some content is relevant to the
task; significant content
omissions may be present.
• The register barely corresponds
to the requirements of the task.
• Only some content points,
which are minimally addressed.
• Uses some basic connectors,
but these may be inaccurate or
repetitive.
• Writes in paragraphs, but may
not use them to separate ideas
(a script may have random
breaks between paragraphs).
• The format may be
inappropriate in places.
• Uses basic vocabulary
reasonably appropriately.
• Has some control of word
formation; can produce some
common word forms correctly.
• Makes frequent errors in
spelling more difficult words,
but simple words are spelled
correctly.
• Errors in word choice and/or
spelling distort meaning at
times.
• Writes simple sentence forms
mostly correctly.
• Errors in grammar and/or
punctuation may distort meaning
at times.
16
2
• Severe irrelevances and
misinterpretations of the task
may be present.
• Only few content points, which
are minimally addressed.
• May use a very limited range
of basic cohesive devices, and
those used may not indicate a
logical relationship between
ideas.
• Attempts to write in
paragraphs, but their use may
be confusing (may start every
sentence with a new line).
• The format may be
inappropriate.
• Uses an extremely limited
range of vocabulary.
• Has very limited control of
word formation; can produce a
few common word forms
correctly.
• Makes many errors in spelling,
including a range of simple
words.
• Errors in word choice and/or
spelling distort meaning.
• Writes some simple sentence
forms correctly.
• Frequent errors in grammar and/
or punctuation distort meaning.
1
• Attempts the task, but it is
largely misinterpreted and the
response is barely relevant to the
task.
• Links are missing or
incorrect.
• Does not write in paragraphs
at all (a script is a block of
text).
• The format is not appropriate.
• Can only use a few isolated
words and/or memorised
phrases.
• Has essentially no control of
word formation; can barely
produce any word forms.
• Displays few examples of
conventional spelling.
• No evidence of sentence forms.
0
• Does not attempt the task in any way.
OR
• The response is completely irrelevant to the task.
OR
• There is too little language to assess.
OR
• Content is completely incomprehensible due to extremely poor handwriting: very few words are distinguishable, so there is a lack of
context to verify meaning.
17
CRITERIA FOR MARKING SPEAKING
Give a mark out of 6 for each criterion (development, fluency, and language) and then calculate a mean to give an overall total out of 6.
Mark /
Criterion
Development and Fluency Language
6
• Produces stretches of language in a register which is
appropriate to the situation provided in the task and may opt to
vary register to enhance meaning.
• Shows sustained ability to maintain a conversation and to make
relevant contributions at some length.
• Produces extended stretches of language despite some
hesitation.
• Can respond to change in direction of the conversation.
• Pronunciation is intelligible.
• Intonation is appropriate.
• Produces error-free simple sentences.
• Uses complex grammatical forms, but may make errors, which rarely
cause comprehension problems.
• Uses a range of appropriate vocabulary to give and exchange views
on a growing range of general and curricular topics.
5
• Produces stretches of language in a register which is
appropriate to the situation provided in the task.
• Responds relevantly and at length which makes frequent
prompting unnecessary, resulting in a competent conversation.
• Produces mostly extended stretches of language despite some
hesitation, although instances of using short phrases may be
present.
• Can generally respond to change in direction of the
conversation.
• Pronunciation is generally intelligible.
• Intonation is generally appropriate.
• Produces error-free simple sentences.
• Uses a range of appropriate vocabulary when talking about a range
of general and curricular topics.
• Occasional mistakes do not cause comprehension problems.
4
• Produces stretches of language in a register which is generally
appropriate to the situation provided in the task.
• Attempts to respond to questions and prompts.
• Produces responses which are extended beyond short phrases,
despite hesitation.
• Effort will need to be made to develop the conversation; only
partial success will be achieved.
• Pronunciation is mostly intelligible.
• May not follow English intonation patterns at times.
• Frequently produces error-free simple sentences.
• Uses appropriate vocabulary to talk about a limited range of general
and curricular topics.
• Errors may cause comprehension problems.
18
3
• Produces stretches of language without awareness of register.
• Responses tend to be brief and are characterised by frequent,
hesitation.
• Has to be encouraged to go beyond short responses and
struggles to develop a conversation.
• There is a lack of intelligibility of pronunciation, but it is
unlikely to impede communication.
• May not follow English intonation patterns frequently.
• Produces basic sentence forms and some correct simple sentences.
• Uses a limited range of appropriate vocabulary to talk about a
limited range of general topics.
• Errors are frequent and may lead to misunderstanding.
2
• Responses are so brief that little is communicated.
• Barely engages in a conversation.
• Pronunciation may cause some communication difficulty.
• Does not follow English intonation patterns.
• Attempts basic sentence forms, but with limited success.
OR
• Heavily relies on apparently memorised utterances.
• Uses a limited range of appropriate vocabulary to talk about a very
limited range of general topics.
• Makes numerous errors except in memorised expressions.
1
• No communication possible.
• Pronunciation and intonation patterns cause difficulty for even
the most sympathetic listener.
• Cannot produce basic sentence forms.
• Can only produce isolated words and phrases or memorised
utterances.
0
• No attempt at the response.
OR
• No rateable language.
19
Transcript
Andrea: Welcome to “People and Places” – where we meet interesting people and find out more
about them – right here on bbclearningenglish.com. Hello, I am Andrea Rose.
Paul McKenna: ‘For everybody it’s different. But usually it’s deep relaxation. People find that
instead of being aware of lots of things we tend to focus on one idea at a time.’
Andrea: Can you guess what Paul McKenna does for a living? He has a rather unusual job. Yes,
he’s a hypnotist. He hypnotises people. In fact, he is one of the Britain’s best known hypnotists. He
mesmerises people into doing extraordinary things. So what’s like to be hypnotised?
Paul McKenna:‘For everybody it’s different. But usually it’s deep relaxation. People find that
instead of being aware of lots of things we tend to focus on one idea at a time. You can probably
compare it to meditation or in business people do a thing called strategic planning where they relax
and imagine what their company will be doing. That seems for me to be the same as hypnosis. All
the great creatives throughout history – Einstein, Mozart, Tessler, Goethe, Walt Disney – lots of
great creatives have referred to that reverie, that creative state where they get their ideas from, in
similar terms when they describe it, as hypnotists would to hypnotic trance.’
Andrea: Paul compares hypnosis to deep relaxation. You feel very relaxed when you’re hypnotised
and you can focus on one thing rather than lots of thoughts. Paul also compares it to meditation or
even strategic planning – like in business when plan how you want to run things. He says that lots
of famous thinkers or creative people – ‘creatives’ – talk about their great thoughts or creativity
coming from a dream-like state – ‘reverie’. He says hypnosis is just like that.
Resources
Listening: the task was adapted from
http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/learningenglish/radio/specials/1728_people_places/page41.shtm
l
20
SPECIFICATION OF SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT FOR TERM 2
Review of Summative Assessment for term 2
Duration of the summative assessment – 40 minutes
Listening – 10 minutes
Reading – 10 minutes
Writing – 20 minutes
Speaking task is conducted separately.
Total marks - 24
The structure of summative assessment
This sample of Summative Assessment consists of 14 questions: listening, reading, writing
and speaking. Different types of tasks are used in the summative assessment for term.
Listening – open-ended and gap-filling tasks on the topic «Virtual Reality».
Reading – matching task on the topic «Out of this World».
Writing – writing a review on the topics «Virtual Reality» and «Out of this World».
Speaking – making a dialogue on the topics «Virtual Reality» and «Out of this World».
Transcript for listening task can be found after the mark scheme.
21
Characteristic of tasks for summative assessment for term 2
Unit Strand Learning objective
*Total
number of
questions
*Question

Type of
question
*Task description Time
Total
marks
Virtual
Reality
Out of this
World
Listening 10.2.1 Understand the main
points in unsupported extended
talk on a wide range of general
and curricular topics, including
talk on a limited range of
unfamiliar topics
6 1
2
3
4
5
6
Openended
Gap
filling
Each learner works individually.
Learners listen to a lecture about
«Drone Racing» on the topic
«Virtual Reality» twice having
chance to look through the
questions before the recording
starts. The task consists of two
types of questions: questions 1-3
are open-ended; questions 4-6
require a word to fill in the gap.
10 minutes 6
Reading 10.4.3 Skim a range of lengthy
texts with speed to identify
content meriting closer reading
on a range of general and
curricular topics
10.4.5 Deduce meaning from
context in extended texts on a
wide range of familiar general
and curricular topics, and some
unfamiliar topics
6 1
2
3
4
5
6
Matching Each learner works individually.
Learners are given a text about
the animal that survived on
Space on the topic «Out of This
World». Learners read the text
and complete the task. This task
consists of 6 questions.
Questions 1-3 require choosing
the best topic for the given
paragraphs. In questions 4-6,
learners should find the words
from the text according to given
definition.
10 minutes 6
Writing 10.5.1 Plan, write, edit and
proofread work at text level
independently on a range of
1 1 Openended
Each learner works individually.
Learners plan and write a film or
game review linking paragraphs
20 minutes 6
22
general and curricular topics
10.5.6 Write coherently at text
level using a variety of
connectors on a range of familiar
general and curricular topics
10.6.9 Use appropriately a wide
variety of active and passive
simple present and past forms
and past perfect simple forms in
narrative and reported speech on
a wide range of familiar general
and curricular topics
into coherent text. Also learners
should use appropriate structures
of active and passive forms.
Speaking 10.3.2 Ask and respond to
complex questions to get
information about a wide range
of general and curricular topics
10.3.3 Explain and justify own
and others’ point of view on a
wide range of general and
curricular topics
10.6.15 Use infinitive forms
after an increased number of
verbs and adjectives, use gerund
forms after a variety of verbs
and prepositions use a variety of
prepositional and phrasal verb
on a wide range of familiar
general and curricular topics
1 1 Openended
Learners work in pairs.
Learners take turns in asking and
answering the questions. They
use cards for a discussion,
explaining and justifying own
viewpoints. They also should
use a variety of infinitive and
gerund forms. The questions can
be based on topics «Virtual
Reality» and «Out of this
World».
Each pair
talks for 2-3 minutes.
6
TOTAL:
40 minutes
(excluding
Speaking)
24
Note: * - sections that can be changed
23
Sample questions and mark scheme
Tasks for the Summative Assessment for term 2
LISTENING
Task. Answer the questions 1-3 while you listen to the recording. Write short answers in the space
provided.
Use the link below to listen to the recording:
https://www.englishlistening.rocks/practice-english-listening-drone-racing
1. Who initiated the first drone racing competition?
_____________________________________________________________ [1]
2. What caused popularity growth of this sport?
_____________________________________________________________ [1]
3. What enables the pilots see what the drone camera sees?
_____________________________________________________________ [1]
Write NO MORE THAN ONE WORD to the questions 4-6 and complete the sentences.
4. Obstructions indoors like walls and tunnels cause _________________ [1]
5. The opportunity for winning ___________________ makes drone racing attractive. [1]
6. The speaker describes this sport as quick and _________________. [1]
Total [6]
READING
Task. Read the article and label the paragraphs 1-3 with their titles A-D. There is one extra title that
you DO NOT NEED TO USE.
Topics:
A) Significance of water bears
B) The Experiment
C) Who are Tardigrades?
D) Objective of Experiment
E) Results of Experiment
Water Bears: The animal that survived space!
Water bears, also known as tardigrades, are a wonder! They are tiny
eight-legged creatures, known for their virtual indestructibility on Earth.
They can survive almost anything: extreme temperatures, tons of radiation,
the pressures of the deep sea, starvation, and nearly a decade without wate r.
Now their legendary toughness has been put to the ultimate test. They've
been sent into space!
Example: 0 Objective of Experiment
In the past, some biologists have suggested that tardigrades may be the only animal to come
back alive after a trip in real space. Scientists now decided to send them into space to find out if that
is true.
1 ___________________ [1]
Once in space, all the water bears were exposed to the vacuum of space, and some were even
exposed to solar and cosmic radiation. After 10 days of exposure to space, the satellite returned to
Earth. The water bears were rehydrated to see how their reproductive abilities were affected.
24
2 ___________________ [1]
The vacuum itself seemed to have little effect on the creatures. But ultraviolet radiation,
which can damage cellular material and DNA, did take its toll. Yet, a handful of animals even
survived full exposure to the Sun's UV light, which is more than 1000 times stronger in space than
on the Earth's surface.
3 ___________________ [1]
Water bears are a mystery. They have an unparalleled ability to cope with the extremely dry
conditions of deep vacuum and the harmful solar and cosmic radiation up there, which has piqued
scientific curiosity. Still, no one quite understands how they can be as resistant as they are. Besides,
they are also challenging our traditional concepts of life, for instance that life depends on water, or
that life is a continuous process.
Task. Read the definition of the word. Find the word with the same meaning in the text and write it.
The paragraph numbers are indicated in brackets.
4. a force of pushing (Para 1) ______________ [1]
5. the best or the biggest (Para 1) ______________ [1]
6. having no equal or match; unique (Para 5)______________ [1]
Total [6]
WRITING
Task. Choose ONE of the topics and write a review.
Topic 1. You have seen a message on your school’s website asking for reviews.
Submit a review!
We are looking for reviews of computer games. Write a review of a game for the
school website. Explain what the game is, say what you enjoy or dislike about the
game, and whether you would recommend it.
Your review should include the following information:
- a description of the game
- the good and bad points about the game
- your opinion on whether or not you recommend the game
Topic 2. You have seen a notice on an international student’s forum asking for reviews of sci-fi
films.
Submit a review!
We are looking for reviews of sci-fi films. Write us a review of a film you know well.
Your review should include the following information:
- what it is called and what it is about, its cast and setting
- who it is aimed at
- your opinion on whether or not you recommend the film
Total [6]
25
SPEAKING
Task. Work in pairs. Choose ONE of the cards and discuss the questions with your partner. You
have 1 minute to prepare and 2-3 minutes to speak.
Card 1
1. Why do people play video games?
2. What is the impact of video games on brain?
3. Do you think that playing computer games has any advantages for children?
4. What types of computer games are popular in Kazakhstan?
Card 2
1. Can computer games be a part of our education and learning? How?
2. Why computer games are becoming more popular?
3. What is better in your view: virtual or physical communication?
4. What is the effect of video games on our attention span?
Card 3
1. How important is learning about space?
2. What is the most important thing for astronomers to research?
3. What do you think of your country’s involvement in space?
4. Will the general public be able to go into space by 2030? Why or why not?
Card 4
1. What springs to your mind when you hear the word ‘cyberbullying’?
2. Do you think online bullying is worse than or not as bad as physical bullying?
3. How much of a problem do you think cyberbullying is?
4. What can people do to stop cyberbullying?
Total [6]
Total marks ____/24
26
Mark scheme
Listening and Reading
Question

Answer Mark Additional information
Listening
1
2
3
4
5
6
amateur flyers 1
social media / video (clips) (spread) on
social media
1 Any answer can be
accepted, if it is appropriate
answer to the question a (special) pair of goggles / goggles / special
goggles
1
collusion(s) 1
Cash 1 money
furious 1
Reading
1
2
3
4
5
6
The Experiment 1 B
Results from Experiment 1 E
Significance of water bears 1 A
pressure 1
Ultimate 1
unparalleled 1
Total marks 12
27
Mark scheme
Writing and Speaking
CRITERIA FOR MARKING WRITING
Give a mark out of 6 for each criterion (content, organisation, vocabulary, grammar and punctuation) and then calculate a mean to give an
overall total out of 6. All fractional marks should be rounded up to the closest whole mark.
Mark /
Criterion
Content (relevance and
development of ideas)
Organisation (cohesion,
paragraphing, and format)
Vocabulary (style and
accuracy)
Grammar (style and accuracy)
and Punctuation (accuracy)
6
• All content is relevant to the
task.
• The register completely
corresponds to the requirements
of the task; consistent and
intentional misuse of register*
may indicate a writer’s personal
style.
• All content points are fully
addressed and developed in a
balanced way.
*Such misuse of register should
not harm the format of writing.
• Uses a wide range of
connectors accurately;
referencing is mostly clear.
• Uses paragraphs to separate
ideas; all paragraphs revolve
around one idea or a set of like
ideas; the size of each
paragraph allows for a proper
and balanced development of
ideas.
• The format is appropriate.
• Uses a range of advanced
vocabulary appropriately; uses
less common lexical items with
occasional inappropriacies.
• Has good control of word
formation; may make occasional
errors in producing less common
word forms.
• Spells common vocabulary
items correctly; very few (one or
two) occasional spelling
mistakes may be present.
• May occasionally misspell less
common lexical items.
• Errors in word choice and/or
spelling do not distort meaning.
• Writes simple and compound
sentence forms correctly and
demonstrates variety in length
and complexity.
• Uses complex sentences
accurately, including
punctuation.
• Rare errors in grammar and/or
punctuation.
5
• All content is relevant to the
task; insignificant content
omissions may be present.
• The register on the whole
corresponds to the requirements
of the task; occasional and
inconsistent misuse of register
may be present.
• Most content points are
addressed, but their development
• Uses a range of basic
connectors accurately and
attempts to use more advanced
connectors, but not always
accurately, and referencing, but
not always clearly or
appropriately.
• Uses paragraphs to separate
ideas; most paragraphs revolve
around one idea or a set of like
• Uses a range of everyday
vocabulary appropriately; uses
less common lexical items, but
may make frequent errors.
• Has good control of word
formation; may make errors in
producing less common word
forms.
• Spells common vocabulary
items correctly; few (no more
• Writes simple and compound
sentence forms correctly, but
does not demonstrate variety in
length.
• Occasional errors in grammar
and/or punctuation do not distort
meaning.
28
may be slightly imbalanced. ideas; the size of each
paragraph may reflect
imbalanced development of
ideas.
• The format is appropriate.
than five) occasional spelling
mistakes may be present.
• May often misspell less
common lexical items.
• Errors in word choice and/or
spelling do not distort meaning.
4
• Most content is relevant to the
task; insignificant content
omissions may be present.
• The register on the whole
corresponds to the requirements
of the task.
• Most content points are
addressed, but some content
points may be more fully
covered than others.
• Uses a range of basic
connectors accurately.
• Uses paragraphs to separate
ideas, but tends to misuse
paragraphing (a script is a set
of very short paragraphs or
some paragraphs may be much
longer than other ones for no
apparent reason).
• The format is generally
appropriate.
• Uses everyday vocabular y
generally appropriately, while
occasionally overusing certain
lexical items.
• Has good control of word
formation; can produce common
word forms correctly.
• May make infrequent errors in
spelling more difficult words.
• Errors in word choice and/or
spelling rarely distort meaning.
• Writes simple and some
compound sentence forms
correctly.
• While errors in grammar and/or
punctuation are noticeable,
meaning is rarely distorted.
3
• Some content is relevant to the
task; significant content
omissions may be present.
• The register barely corresponds
to the requirements of the task.
• Only some content points,
which are minimally addressed.
• Uses some basic connectors,
but these may be inaccurate or
repetitive.
• Writes in paragraphs, but may
not use them to separate ideas
(a script may have random
breaks between paragraphs).
• The format may be
inappropriate in places.
• Uses basic vocabulary
reasonably appropriately.
• Has some control of word
formation; can produce some
common word forms correctly.
• Makes frequent errors in
spelling more difficult words,
but simple words are spelled
correctly.
• Errors in word choice and/or
spelling distort meaning at
times.
• Writes simple sentence forms
mostly correctly.
• Errors in grammar and/or
punctuation may distort meaning
at times.
2
• Severe irrelevances and
misinterpretations of the task
may be present.
• Only few content points, which
are minimally addressed.
• May use a very limited range
of basic cohesive devices, and
those used may not indicate a
logical relationship between
ideas.
• Uses an extremely limited
range of vocabulary.
• Has very limited control of
word formation; can produce a
few common word forms
• Writes some simple sentence
forms correctly.
• Frequent errors in grammar and/
or punctuation distort meaning.
29
• Attempts to write in
paragraphs, but their use may
be confusing (may start every
sentence with a new line).
• The format may be
inappropriate.
correctly.
• Makes many errors in spelling,
including a range of simple
words.
• Errors in word choice and/or
spelling distort meaning.
1
• Attempts the task, but it is
largely misinterpreted and the
response is barely relevant to the
task.
• Links are missing or
incorrect.
• Does not write in paragraphs
at all (a script is a block of
text).
• The format is not appropriate.
• Can only use a few isolated
words and/or memorised
phrases.
• Has essentially no control of
word formation; can barely
produce any word forms.
• Displays few examples of
conventional spelling.
• No evidence of sentence forms.
0
• Does not attempt the task in any way.
OR
• The response is completely irrelevant to the task.
OR
• There is too little language to assess.
OR
• Content is completely incomprehensible due to extremely poor handwriting: very few words are distinguishable, so there is a lack of
context to verify meaning.
30
CRITERIA FOR MARKING SPEAKING
Give a mark out of 6 for each criterion (development, fluency, and language) and then calculate a mean to give an overall total out of 6.
Mark /
Criterion
Development and Fluency Language
6
• Produces stretches of language in a register which is
appropriate to the situation provided in the task and may opt to
vary register to enhance meaning.
• Shows sustained ability to maintain a conversation and to make
relevant contributions at some length.
• Produces extended stretches of language despite some
hesitation.
• Can respond to change in direction of the conversation.
• Pronunciation is intelligible.
• Intonation is appropriate.
• Produces error-free simple sentences.
• Uses complex grammatical forms, but may make errors, which rarely
cause comprehension problems.
• Uses a range of appropriate vocabulary to give and exchange views
on a growing range of general and curricular topics.
5
• Produces stretches of language in a register which is
appropriate to the situation provided in the task.
• Responds relevantly and at length which makes frequent
prompting unnecessary, resulting in a competent conversation.
• Produces mostly extended stretches of language despite some
hesitation, although instances of using short phrases may be
present.
• Can generally respond to change in direction of the
conversation.
• Pronunciation is generally intelligible.
• Intonation is generally appropriate.
• Produces error-free simple sentences.
• Uses a range of appropriate vocabulary when talking about a range
of general and curricular topics.
• Occasional mistakes do not cause comprehension problems.
4
• Produces stretches of language in a register which is generally
appropriate to the situation provided in the task.
• Attempts to respond to questions and prompts.
• Produces responses which are extended beyond short phrases,
despite hesitation.
• Effort will need to be made to develop the conversation; only
partial success will be achieved.
• Pronunciation is mostly intelligible.
• May not follow English intonation patterns at times.
• Frequently produces error-free simple sentences.
• Uses appropriate vocabulary to talk about a limited range of general
and curricular topics.
• Errors may cause comprehension problems.
31
3
• Produces stretches of language without awareness of register.
• Responses tend to be brief and are characterised by frequent,
hesitation.
• Has to be encouraged to go beyond short responses and
struggles to develop a conversation.
• There is a lack of intelligibility of pronunciation, but it is
unlikely to impede communication.
• May not follow English intonation patterns frequently.
• Produces basic sentence forms and some correct simple sentences.
• Uses a limited range of appropriate vocabulary to talk about a
limited range of general topics.
• Errors are frequent and may lead to misunderstanding.
2
• Responses are so brief that little is communicated.
• Barely engages in a conversation.
• Pronunciation may cause some communication difficulty.
• Does not follow English intonation patterns.
• Attempts basic sentence forms, but with limited success.
OR
• Heavily relies on apparently memorised utterances.
• Uses a limited range of appropriate vocabulary to talk about a very
limited range of general topics.
• Makes numerous errors except in memorised expressions.
1
• No communication possible.
• Pronunciation and intonation patterns cause difficulty for even
the most sympathetic listener.
• Cannot produce basic sentence forms.
• Can only produce isolated words and phrases or memorised
utterances.
0
• No attempt at the response.
OR
• No rateable language.
32
Transcript
What’s the latest fad in sport? Drone racing.
Popular with technology geeks and thrill seekers, drone racing combines virtual reality technology
with video game competition.
The history of drone racing starts in 2014. Instead of flying drone around a field, amateur flyers
decided to have fun by organising races. Small cameras on the drones allowed flyers to record and
upload races. As video clips of racing drones spread across social media, interest in the sport grew.
Racing drone technology is different from the machines sold to department stories. Racing drones
are designed to go fast. Many fly up to 160 kph. In addition, drone flyers, called pilots, wear a
special pair of goggles that lets them see what the camera sees.
The feeling is very virtual reality. It’s like you are in the driver’s seat of the drone. Good quality
racing drones cost around $500. Some are more than $3000. The goggles cost between $100 and
$400.
Like video games, racing is exiting. Races are held on a track. Some are inside a building and others
are outdoors. Indoor tracks have obstacles, like walls and tunnels, which means collisions do occur.
It’s common for a drone to hit something and smash into small pieces.
Races are held in many countries including the US, Canada, England and France. International
games attract 100 or more racers hoping to win cash. In 2016, a pilot from England won $250.000
for finishing first in a race in Dubai.
Drone racing is a new sport that seems to be catching on. Some races are shown on TV.
It’s a fast and furious sport that takes cutting edge game technology to the next level.
33
SPECIFICATION OF SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT FOR TERM 3
Review of summative assessment for term 3
Duration of the summative assessment – 40 minutes
Listening – 10 minutes
Reading – 10 minutes
Writing – 20 minutes
Speaking task is conducted separately.
Total marks- 24
The structure of the summative assessment
This sample of Summative Assessment consists of 14 questions: listening, reading, writing
and speaking. Different types of tasks are used in the Summative Assessment for term.
Listening – table completion task on the topic «Imagination and Creativity».
Reading – reordering and True/False tasks on the topic «Stress and Fear».
Writing – open-ended task on the topics «Stress and Fear», «Imagination and Creativity» or
«Reading for Pleasure».
Speaking – making a dialogue on the topics «Stress and Fear», «Imagination and Creativity»
or «Reading for Pleasure».
Tapescript for listening task can be found in CD3 Tapescript 1. Transcript for listening task
can be found after the mark scheme.
34
Characteristic of tasks for summative assessment for term 3
Unit Strand Learning objective
*Total
number of
questions
*Question

Type of
question
*Task description Time
Total
marks
Stress and
Fear
Imagination
and
Creativity
Reading for
Pleasure
Listening 10.2.3 Understand the detail
of an argument in
unsupported extended talk
on a wide range of general
and curricular topics,
including talk on a limited
range of unfamiliar topics
10.2.4 Understand implied
meaning in unsupported
extended talk on a wide
range of general and
curricular topics, including
talk on a limited range of
unfamiliar topics
6 1
2
3
4
5
6
Table
completion
Each learner works individually.
Learners listen to two
conversations about pieces of art
on the topic «Imagination and
Creativity» twice having chance
to look through the questions
before the recording starts. The
task consists of 2 questions on
identifying the implied meaning
and 4 questions on identifying
the details of an argument.
Questions require short answers
in a word or a phrase.
10 minutes 6
Reading 10.4.2 Understand specific
information and detail in
extended texts on a range of
familiar general and
curricular topics, and some
unfamiliar topics
10.4.7 Recognise patterns of
development in lengthy
texts [inter-paragraph level]
on a range of general and
curricular topics
6 1
2
3
4
5
6
Reordering
True/False
Each learner works individually.
Learners read a text called
«Adrenaline Junkies» on the
topic «Stress and Fear» and
complete the task. The task
consists of 2 parts: part 1
requires putting the given
paragraphs in the correct order.
Part 2 asks to identify specific
information and details and mark
the statements True/False
according to the context.
10 minutes 6
35
Writing 10.5.3 Write with
grammatical accuracy on a
range of familiar general
and curricular topics
10.5.7 Use independently
appropriate layout at text
level on a range of general
and curricular topics
1 1 Openended
Each learner works individually.
Learner should continue the
given story using imagination,
creativity and experiences. They
should write using appropriate
layout and grammar structures to
express comparative degrees and
intensifying adjectives.
20 minutes 6
Speaking 10.3.4 Evaluate and
comment on the views of
others in a growing variety
of talk contexts on a
growing range of general
and curricular topics
10.3.6 Navigate talk and
modify language through
paraphrase and correction in
talk on a range of familiar
general and curricular topics
1 1 Openended
Learners work in pairs.
They will be given a card with
questions. Learners have 1
minute to prepare the talk and 2-3 minutes to speak on it. The
content of the cards is focused
on the topics «Stress and Fear»,
«Imagination and Creativity» or
«Reading for Pleasure».
2-3
minutes
for a pair
6
TOTAL:
40 minutes
(excluding
Speaking)
24
Note: *-sections that can be changed
36
Sample questions and mark scheme
Tasks for the Summative Assessment for term 3
LISTENING
Task. Listen to two different conversations and for questions 1 and 4, in a word or phrase, write
what the feeling or message is that they think each artist is trying to convey. For questions 2-3 and
5-6, underline the correct option and write the key words or phrases from the listening that support
your answers. CD3 Tapescript 1.
Artist’s feeling or
message
Does the woman
like/dislike the
painting?
Does the man
like/dislike the
painting?
Conversation 1 1)
___________________
___________________
___________________
[1]
2)
___________________
___________________
___________________
[1]
3)
___________________
___________________
___________________
[1]
Conversation 2 4)
___________________
___________________
___________________
[1]
5)
___________________
___________________
___________________
[1]
6)
___________________
___________________
___________________
[1]
Total [6]
READING
Task. Read the text carefully. The given paragraphs are not in correct order. Number the paragraphs
A-D in the correct order 1-4.
Example: 0-C
1 ________ [1]
2 ________ [1]
3 ________ [1]
Adrenaline Junkies
A You might think that the whole point of an extreme sport is that it is dangerous. Although
this is important, it isn’t only danger that these sportspeople are seeking. They also find these sports
incredibly exhilarating and, in fact, it’s this element – the combination of fear and enjoyment – that
provides the real thrill. In the case of an extreme sportsperson, fear becomes pleasure.
B In today’s world, where actually predators and natural dangers seldom exist, this response
can eventually cause stress and feelings of anxiety. In addition, any decisions we make in a risky
situation can actually be influenced by the effect adrenaline has on the body. For some people
adrenaline can have long-term negative effects, but others can actually get addicted to it and the
feeling it gives. These people are often referred to as “adrenaline addicts” or “adrenaline junkies”.
C Adrenaline is the hormone that prepares our bodies to react in times of stress or danger.
When a person perceives a situation as dangerous, adrenaline is released into the bloodstream in
order to increase blood flow and heart rate. Blood is rapidly supplied to the parts of the body needed
most, like the legs and the pupils of the eyes. At the same time, the supply is reduced to areas of less
importance, like the skin and stomach.
D Evidence of this phenomenon can be found in the ever-growing world of extreme sports.
There is now a wide range of sports designed to give these adrenaline junkies the thrill they need.
Ever more strange are emerging – from the more usual (such as skydiving or snowboarding) to the
37
incredibly dangerous. Examples of these include base jumping (when people parachute off
buildings or cliffs), ice climbing, and cave diving.
Task. Read the article again and mark the sentences True or False.
4. The effects of adrenaline can vary from person to person. ______ [1]
5. The adrenaline response is a necessary part of life. ______ [1]
6. It is impossible to have the feeling of sacredness and enjoyment at the same time. ______ [1]
Total [6]
WRITING
Task. Choose ONE of the topics and write a story.
Topic 1. You are asked to write a story for your school magazine continuing the following
sentence:
“Megan could see straight away that the painting was a fake.”
In your writing try to use linking words for structure, correct style, layout and different
adjectives. Write 3 paragraphs using the plan below:
Paragraph 1 - when / where / description of the main characters
Paragraph 2 - events in the order they happened/ your feelings
Paragraph 3 - the end of the story (resolution)
Topic 2. You are asked to write a story for your school magazine continuing the following
sentences:
“I knew it was going to be a strange night.”
In your writing try to use linking words for structure, correct style. Write 3 paragraphs
using the plan below:
Paragraph 1 - when / where / description of the main characters
Paragraph 2 - events in the order they happened/ your feelings
Paragraph 3 - the end of the story (resolution)
Total [6]
SPEAKING
Task. Work in pairs. Choose ONE of the cards and answer the questions. You have 1 minute to
prepare and 2-3 minutes to speak.
In your speaking you should:
 evaluate and comment on the views of others;
 try to keep the conversation going;
 modify language through paraphrase and correction.
Card 1
1. How do you think people react in a life or death disaster situation?
2. What would you do when you are on a plane and the flight attendant starts to explain
the safety procedures?
3. How do people usually behave in emergency situations? Why?
4. What would you do if you were in a hotel on the 5
th
floor and fire alarm went off in the
middle of the night?
38
Card 2
1. What is phobia?
2. What are the most common types of phobias?
3. Do you have any phobias or is there anything you are afraid of?
4. How does your “fight or flight response” work?
Card 3
1. Do you think creativity comes with time and thought or people are born creative talent?
2. What are some ways that a person can be creative?
3. Does the education system in your country encourage creativity? How?
4. Is creativity a good thing? Why or why not?
Card 4
1. What is the most amazing thing about human brain?
2. What are some extraordinary things some people can do with their brains?
3. Do you think humans will ever completely understand the brain? Why or why not?
4. What do you do to train your brain?
Card 5
1. What is the book that you have recently read?
2. How well do you think the author built the world in the book you have recently read?
3. What do you think the author’s purpose was in writing this book?
4. What symbols did the author use to support the main idea(s)?
Card 6
1. What was your initial reaction to the book that you have recently read?
2. How credible or believable did you find the narrator to be?
3. How did the structure of the book affect the story?
4. Did the book change your opinion or perspective about anything? Why or why not?
Total [6]
Total marks____/24
39
Mark scheme
Listening and Reading
Question

Answer Mark Additional information
Listening
1 Possible answers: unsettling / disturbing / the
contrast of black and white
1
Any answer can be
accepted, if it is
appropriate answer to
the question. A learner
can get only one point
for each question.
2 Possible answers: you feel like the photo might
fade to black / the more I look the more I like it
1
3 Possible answers: it’s (really) quite captivating
/ i’s interesting how the artist conveys the
feelings
1
4 Possible answers: to show the true beauty of
the objects / making the objects look real /
realism
1
5 Possible answers: the details are incredible / the
texture of foil is so real
1
6 Possible answers: it’s making my mouth
watering / this is impressive
1
Reading
1 B 1
2 D 1
3 A 1
4 True 1
5 True 1
6 False 1
Total marks 12
40
Mark scheme
Writing and Speaking
CRITERIA FOR MARKING WRITING
Give a mark out of 6 for each criterion (content, organisation, vocabulary, grammar and punctuation) and then calculate a mean to give an
overall total out of 6. All fractional marks should be rounded up to the closest whole mark.
Mark /
Criterion
Content (relevance and
development of ideas)
Organisation (cohesion,
paragraphing, and format)
Vocabulary (style and
accuracy)
Grammar (style and accuracy)
and Punctuation (accuracy)
6
• All content is relevant to the
task.
• The register completely
corresponds to the requirements
of the task; consistent and
intentional misuse of register*
may indicate a writer’s personal
style.
• All content points are fully
addressed and developed in a
balanced way.
*Such misuse of register should
not harm the format of writing.
• Uses a wide range of
advanced connectors
accurately; referencing is
mostly clear.
• Uses paragraphs to separate
ideas; all paragraphs revolve
around one idea or a set of like
ideas; the size of each
paragraph allows for a proper
and balanced development of
ideas.
• The format is appropriate.
• Uses a range of advanced
vocabulary appropriately; uses
less common lexical items with
occasional inappropriacies.
• Has good control of word
formation; may make occasional
errors in producing less common
word forms.
• Spells common vocabulary
items correctly; very few (one or
two) occasional spelling
mistakes may be present.
• May occasionally misspell less
common lexical items.
• Errors in word choice and/or
spelling do not distort meaning.
• Writes simple and compound
sentence forms correctly and
demonstrates variety in length
and complexity.
• Uses complex sentences
accurately, including
punctuation.
• Rare errors in grammar and/or
punctuation.
5
• All content is relevant to the
task; insignificant content
omissions may be present.
• The register on the whole
corresponds to the requirements
of the task; occasional and
inconsistent misuse of register
may be present.
• Most content points are
addressed, but their development
• Uses a range of basic
connectors accurately and
attempts to use more advanced
connectors, but not always
accurately, and referencing, but
not always clearly or
appropriately.
• Uses paragraphs to separate
ideas; most paragraphs revolve
around one idea or a set of like
• Uses a range of everyday
vocabulary appropriately; uses
less common lexical items, but
may make frequent errors.
• Has good control of word
formation; may make errors in
producing less common word
forms.
• Spells common vocabulary
items correctly; few (no more
• Writes simple and compound
sentence forms correctly, but
does not demonstrate variety in
length.
• Occasional errors in grammar
and/or punctuation do not distort
meaning.
41
may be slightly imbalanced. ideas; the size of each
paragraph may reflect
imbalanced development of
ideas.
• The format is appropriate.
than five) occasional spelling
mistakes may be present.
• May often misspell less
common lexical items.
• Errors in word choice and/or
spelling do not distort meaning.
4
• Most content is relevant to the
task; insignificant content
omissions may be present.
• The register on the whole
corresponds to the requirements
of the task.
• Most content points are
addressed, but some content
points may be more fully
covered than others.
• Uses a range of basic
connectors accurately.
• Uses paragraphs to separate
ideas, but tends to misuse
paragraphing (a script is a set
of very short paragraphs or
some paragraphs may be much
longer than other ones for no
apparent reason).
• The format is generally
appropriate.
• Uses everyday vocabulary
generally appropriately, while
occasionally overusing certain
lexical items.
• Has good control of word
formation; can produce common
word forms correctly.
• May make infrequent errors in
spelling more difficult words.
• Errors in word choice and/or
spelling rarely distort meaning.
• Writes simple and some
compound sentence forms
correctly.
• While errors in grammar and/or
punctuation are noticeable,
meaning is rarely distorted.
3
• Some content is relevant to the
task; significant content
omissions may be present.
• The register barely corresponds
to the requirements of the task.
• Only some content points,
which are minimally addressed.
• Uses some basic connectors,
but these may be inaccurate or
repetitive.
• Writes in paragraphs, but may
not use them to separate ideas
(a script may have random
breaks between paragraphs).
• The format may be
inappropriate in places.
• Uses basic vocabulary
reasonably appropriately.
• Has some control of word
formation; can produce some
common word forms correctly.
• Makes frequent errors in
spelling more difficult words,
but simple words are spelled
correctly.
• Errors in word choice and/or
spelling distort meaning at
times.
• Writes simple sentence forms
mostly correctly.
• Errors in grammar and/or
punctuation may distort meaning
at times.
2
• Severe irrelevances and
misinterpretations of the task
may be present.
• Only few content points, which
are minimally addressed.
• May use a very limited range
of basic cohesive devices, and
those used may not indicate a
logical relationship between
ideas.
• Uses an extremely limited
range of vocabulary.
• Has very limited control of
word formation; can produce a
few common word forms
• Writes some simple sentence
forms correctly.
• Frequent errors in grammar and/
or punctuation distort meaning.
42
• Attempts to write in
paragraphs, but their use may
be confusing (may start every
sentence with a new line).
• The format may be
inappropriate.
correctly.
• Makes many errors in spelling,
including a range of simple
words.
• Errors in word choice and/or
spelling distort meaning.
1
• Attempts the task, but it is
largely misinterpreted and the
response is barely relevant to the
task.
• Links are missing or
incorrect.
• Does not write in paragraphs
at all (a script is a block of
text).
• The format is not appropriate.
• Can only use a few isolated
words and/or memorised
phrases.
• Has essentially no control of
word formation; can barely
produce any word forms.
• Displays few examples of
conventional spelling.
• No evidence of sentence forms.
0
• Does not attempt the task in any way.
OR
• The response is completely irrelevant to the task.
OR
• There is too little language to assess.
OR
• Content is completely incomprehensible due to extremely poor handwriting: very few words are distinguishable, so there is a lack of
context to verify meaning.
43
CRITERIA FOR MARKING SPEAKING
Give a mark out of 6 for each criterion (development, fluency, and language) and then calculate a mean to give an overall total out of 6.
Mark /
Criterion
Development and Fluency Language
6
• Produces stretches of language in a register which is
appropriate to the situation provided in the task and may opt to
vary register to enhance meaning.
• Shows sustained ability to maintain a conversation and to make
relevant contributions at some length.
• Produces extended stretches of language despite some
hesitation.
• Can respond to change in direction of the conversation.
• Pronunciation is intelligible.
• Intonation is appropriate.
• Produces error-free simple sentences.
• Uses complex grammatical forms, but may make errors, which rarely
cause comprehension problems.
• Uses a range of appropriate vocabulary to give and exchange views
on a growing range of general and curricular topics.
5
• Produces stretches of language in a register which is
appropriate to the situation provided in the task.
• Responds relevantly and at length which makes frequent
prompting unnecessary, resulting in a competent conversation.
• Produces mostly extended stretches of language despite some
hesitation, although instances of using short phrases may be
present.
• Can generally respond to change in direction of the
conversation.
• Pronunciation is generally intelligible.
• Intonation is generally appropriate.
• Produces error-free simple sentences.
• Uses a range of appropriate vocabulary when talking about a range
of general and curricular topics.
• Occasional mistakes do not cause comprehension problems.
4
• Produces stretches of language in a register which is generally
appropriate to the situation provided in the task.
• Attempts to respond to questions and prompts.
• Produces responses which are extended beyond short phrases,
despite hesitation.
• Effort will need to be made to develop the conversation; only
partial success will be achieved.
• Pronunciation is mostly intelligible.
• May not follow English intonation patterns at times.
• Frequently produces error-free simple sentences.
• Uses appropriate vocabulary to talk about a limited range of general
and curricular topics.
• Errors may cause comprehension problems.
44
3
• Produces stretches of language without awareness of register.
• Responses tend to be brief and are characterised by frequent,
hesitation.
• Has to be encouraged to go beyond short responses and
struggles to develop a conversation.
• There is a lack of intelligibility of pronunciation, but it is
unlikely to impede communication.
• May not follow English intonation patterns frequently.
• Produces basic sentence forms and some correct simple sentences.
• Uses a limited range of appropriate vocabulary to talk about a
limited range of general topics.
• Errors are frequent and may lead to misunderstanding.
2
• Responses are so brief that little is communicated.
• Barely engages in a conversation.
• Pronunciation may cause some communication difficulty.
• Does not follow English intonation patterns.
• Attempts basic sentence forms, but with limited success.
OR
• Heavily relies on apparently memorised utterances.
• Uses a limited range of appropriate vocabulary to talk about a very
limited range of general topics.
• Makes numerous errors except in memorised expressions.
1
• No communication possible.
• Pronunciation and intonation patterns cause difficulty for even
the most sympathetic listener.
• Cannot produce basic sentence forms.
• Can only produce isolated words and phrases or memorised
utterances.
0
• No attempt at the response.
OR
• No rateable language.
45
Transcript
Narrator: Conversation number one.
Man: Sara, come over here and check this out.
Woman: Uh-huh … what are you looking at? Oh … it’s a bit … dark.
Man: Well, yeah, and thus the title: “Storm clouds over beach.”
Woman: Hmmm. It’s unsettling, isn’t it?
Man: Yeah … it is a little disturbing. It’s interesting how the artist manages to
convey that feeling. There’s the contrast of the dark sky and beach with the white
foam of the water …
Woman: And … the last bit of sun is just about to be swallowed by the
oncoming storm. You feel like the photo might fade to black at any moment.
Man: You can almost hear the ebb and flow of the tide, too, can’t you?
Woman: Yeah … You know, at first I didn’t really care for this photo, but the
more I look … the more I like it.
Man: Yes, it does. It’s really quite captivating …
Narrator: Conversation number two.
Woman 2: Look the detail on this. It’s incredible.
Man 2: Yeah, I am not a big fan of realism, but this is impressive. It almost looks like
a photograph.
Woman 2: The texture of the tin foil is so real. How on earth did he do that? And
look at how the light reflects here, and … there’s shadow there. You can almost feel
the sun moving slowly across the canvas as the artist painted, can’t you?
Man 2: I can’t get over the colour of the grapes. It’s making my mouth water.
Woman2: Yeah, it’s almost like you’ve put on a pair of glasses … and you’re
really seeing this fruit and the foil …
Man 2: I think that’s what the artist wanted … for us to see the true beauty of these objects

Woman 2: Hmm-mm. You know, I’d like to reach right in, take one of those
grapes and pop it in my mouth.
Man 2: Me, too. Hey, let’s grab some lunch in the café downstairs. I’m getting hungry.
Woman 2: Sounds good!
Resources
Listening: the task was adapted from Susan Stempleski (2007), “World Pass Advanced” Student’s
Book (Unit 11 The Impact of Art). Thomson ELT
46
SPECIFICATION OF SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT FOR TERM 4
Review of Summative Assessment for term 4
Duration of the summative assessment - 40 minutes
Listening – 10 minutes
Reading – 10 minutes
Writing – 20 minutes
Speaking task is conducted separately.
Total marks- 24
The structure of the summative assessment
This sample of Summative Assessment consists of 14 questions: listening, reading, writing
and speaking. Different types of tasks are used in the Summative Assessment for term.
Listening – multiple-choice and sentence completion tasks the topic «Different Ways of
Living».
Reading – Yes/No/ Not given task on the topic «Independent Project».
Writing – writing an opinion essay on the topics «Different Ways of Living» and
«Independent Project».
Speaking – making a monologue on the topics «Different Ways of Living» and «Independent
Project».
Transcript for listening task can be found after the mark scheme.
47
Characteristic of tasks for summative assessment for term 4
Unit Strand Learning objective
*Total
number of
questions
*Question

*Type of
question
*Task description Time
Total
marks
Different
Ways of
Living
Independent
Project
Listening 10.2.5 Recognise the
attitude or opinion of the
speaker(s) in unsupported
extended talk on a wide
range of general and
curricular topics,
including talk on a
limited range of
unfamiliar topics
10.2.6 Deduce meaning
from context in
unsupported extended
talk on a wide range of
general and curricular
topics, including talk on a
limited range of
unfamiliar topics
6 1
2
3
4
5
6
Multiplechoice
Sentence
completion
Each learner works individually.
Learners listen to the recording
twice on the topic «Different
Ways of Living» having chance to
look through the questions before
the recording starts. The task
consists of 3 multiple-choice
questions with one possible
answer where learners choose
correct answer from three
alternatives A, B or C and 3
questions on completing the
sentences with one word.
10 minutes 6
Reading 10.4.4 Read a wide range
of extended fiction and
non-fiction texts on
familiar and unfamiliar
general and curricular
topics
10.4.6 Recognise the
attitude or opinion of the
writer in extended texts
on a wide range of
6 1
2
3
4
5
6
Yes/No/
Not given
Each learner works individually.
Learners are given a text on the
topic «Independent Project»:
Planning a sustainable city”.
Learners read the text and mark
the statements Yes/No/Not given.
10 minutes 6
48
familiar general and
curricular topics
Writing 10.5.5 Develop with
support coherent
arguments supported
when necessary by
examples and reasons for
a wide range of written
genres in familiar general
and curricular topics
10.5.9 Punctuate written
work at text level on a
wide range of general and
curricular topics with a
good degree of accuracy
10.6.17 Use if / if only in
third conditional
structures, use a variety
of relative clauses
including with which
[whole previous clause
reference] on a wide
range of familiar general
and curricular topics
1 1 Open
ended
Each learner works individually.
Learners write two body
paragraphs of an opinion essay
about healthy life or future
sustainable city. In writing they
use appropriate linking words and
spell words correctly. Also they
should use conditional structures.
20 minutes 6
Speaking 10.3.3 Explain and justify
own and others’ point of
view on a wide range of
general and curricular
topics
10.3.7 Use appropriate
subject-specific
vocabulary and syntax to
1 1 Open
ended
Learners work individually,
explaining and justifying their
viewpoints on topics «Different
Ways of Living» and
«Independent Project». They
should use topic related
vocabulary appropriately when
speaking. Also they should use a
Each
learner
talks for 2-3 minutes.
6
49
talk about a range of
general and curricular
topics
10.6.8 Use a variety of
future active and passive
and future continuous
forms on a wide range of
familiar general and
curricular topics
variety of future forms.
TOTAL:
40 minutes
(excluding
Speaking)
24
Note: *-sections that can be changed
50
Sample questions and mark scheme
Tasks for the Summative Assessment for term 4
LISTENING
Task. Listen to the recording and choose the correct answer according to what you hear.
Follow the link below to listen to the audio (listen until 2.11).
http://learnenglishteens.britishcouncil.org/skills/listening-skills-practice/man-or-beast.
1. The presenter finds Charles Foster’s book …
A) extraordinary.
B) trivial.
C) unbelievable. [1]
2. When describing the book, Jon’s voice creates the atmosphere of …
A) hesitation.
B) suspicion.
C) triumph. [1]
3. According to Jon, Foster …
A) conducted thorough investigation before going for a wild.
B) had no chance to prepare for his experiment properly.
C) was unable live the same life as animals in the wild. [1]
Task 2. Write no more than ONE word to complete the sentences.
4. According to Foster, children are better than adults at living like animals because they are more
_________________________. [1]
5. A/an ___________ is a very small creature with no bones, arms or legs which lives in soil.
[1]
6. Foster found it difficult to _______________ the otter’s reoccupation with food. [1]
Total [6]
READING
Task. Read the article below and mark the statements YES / NO / NOT GIVEN.
Sustainable architecture – lessons from the ant
Termite mounds were the inspiration for an innovative design in sustainable living
The extraordinary Eastgate Building in Harare, Zimbabwe’s capital city, is said to be the only
one in the world to use the same cooling and heating principles as the termite mound.
This is all possible only because Harare is 1600 feet above sea level, has cloudless skies, little
humidity and rapid temperature swings days as warm as 31C commonly drop to 14C at night.
‘You couldn’t do this in New York, with its fantastically hot summers and fantastically cold
winters,’ architect Mick Pearce said. But then his eyes lit up at the challenge. ‘Perhaps you could
store the summer’s heat in winter somehow.’
The engineering firm of Ove Amp & Partners, which worked with him on the design,
monitors daily temperatures outside, under the floors and at knee, desk and ceiling level. Ove
Amp’s graphs show that the temperature of the building has generally stayed between 23C and
25C with the exception of the annual hot spell just before the summer rains in October, and three
days in November, when a janitor accidentally switched off the fans at night.
51
Pearce, disdaining smooth glass skins as ‘igloos in the Sahara’, calls his building, with its
exposed girders and pipes, ‘spiky’. The design of the entrances in based on the porcupine-quill
headdresses of the local Shona tribe. Elevators are designed to look like the mineshaft cages used in
Zimbabwe’s diamond mines. The shape of the fan covers, and the stone used in the construction,
are echoes of Great Zimbabwe, the ruins that give the country its name.
Standing on a roof catwalk, peering down inside at people as small as termites below. Pearce
said he hoped plants would grow wild in the atrium and pigeons and bats would move into it like
that termite fungus, further extending the whole ‘organic machine’ metaphor.
1. Mick Pearce was a designer of Eastgate Building. ________ [1]
2. Mick does not see any perspectives of using the termite mound system of
cooling and heating other parts of the world.
________ [1]
3. It is easier to build something similar to Eastgate in countries with warm
climate rather than cold one.
________ [1]
4. Ove Amp’s data suggest that Eastgate’s temperature control system functions
well for most of the year.
________ [1]
5. Some elements of Eastgate Building reflect important features of Zimbabwe’s
history and culture.
________ [1]
6. Pearce believes that his building would be improved by better protection from
harmful organisms.
________ [1]
Total [6]
WRITING
Task. Choose ONE of the topics and write two body paragraphs of an essay.
 Support your ideas with arguments for and/or against;
 Give reasons or examples;
 Use appropriate punctuation marks;
 Follow the structure using appropriate linking devices.
Topic 1. Is it better to eat healthy or exercise to be healthy?
Topic 2. Should the government spend money on building sustainable cities?
Total [6]
SPEAKING
Task. Choose ONE of the cards and answer the questions. You have 1 minute to prepare and 2-3
minutes to speak.
Card 1
1. What springs to your mind when you hear the word “future”?
2. Do you think the future will be good?
3. What do you think future cities will be like?
4. Would you prefer to live in the future or in today’s world?
52
Card 2
1. How do you think cities will change in the future?
2. What do you think of the idea of underwater cities?
3. What questions would you like to ask an expert on the future?
4. What bad things do you think might be in the future?
Card 3
1. Do you lead a fast lifestyle? Explain.
2. Can you think of three things you can do to slow down and have happier life?
3. To what extent do you think technology makes people live their lives at full speed?
4. What kind of lifestyle people will have 50 years from now? How will the life change?
Card 4
1. Would you change your lifestyle if you could? How?
2. Would you enjoy working from home? Why? Why not?
3. What reasons make people travel and work abroad?
4. What types of things make you feel happy?
Card 5
1. Would you like to live in an eco-city? Why or why not?
2. How would your life change if you moved to an eco-city?
3. What habits would you abandon to live in it?
4. Who should be responsible for protecting our resources – government or individuals?
Card 6
1. What are the advantages and disadvantages of living in a big city?
2. What changes have you observed in your city in past 5 years?
3. If you were the mayor of your city, what would you do to improve it?
4. Which is better, living in the countryside or in the city?
Card 7
1. Why did the phenomenon of downshifting appear?
2. How can we find work-life balance and work-family balance?
3. Is it possible to arrange your life so as to have enough time for yourself and your family
and enough money for a living at the same time?
4. What do you think about freelance?
Card 8
1. What would life be like without money?
2. How often do you think about money?
3. What does the expression “money does not grow on tree” mean? What would life be
like if money grew on trees?
4. To what extent are you good at saving money?
Total [6]
Total marks____/24
53
Mark scheme
Listening and Reading
Question

Answer Mark Additional information
Listening
1 A 1
2 C 1
3 A 1
4 sociable 1
5 earthworm 1
6 recreate 1
Reading
1 YES 1 Y
2 NO 1 N
3 NOT GIVEN 1 NG
4 YES 1 Y
5 YES 1 Y
6 NO 1 N
Total marks 12
54
Mark scheme
Writing and Speaking
CRITERIA FOR MARKING WRITING
Give a mark out of 6 for each criterion (content, organisation, vocabulary, grammar and punctuation) and then calculate a mean to give an
overall total out of 6. All fractional marks should be rounded up to the closest whole mark.
Mark /
Criterion
Content (relevance and
development of ideas)
Organisation (cohesion,
paragraphing, and format)
Vocabulary (style and
accuracy)
Grammar (style and accuracy)
and Punctuation (accuracy)
6
• All content is relevant to the
task.
• The register completely
corresponds to the requirements
of the task; consistent and
intentional misuse of register*
may indicate a writer’s personal
style.
• All content points are fully
addressed and developed in a
balanced way.
*Such misuse of register should
not harm the format of writing.
• Uses a wide range of
connectors accurately;
referencing is mostly clear.
• Uses paragraphs to separate
ideas; all paragraphs revolve
around one idea or a set of like
ideas; the size of each
paragraph allows for a proper
and balanced development of
ideas.
• The format is appropriate.
• Uses a range of advanced
vocabulary appropriately; uses
less common lexical items with
occasional inappropriacies.
• Has good control of word
formation; may make occasional
errors in producing less common
word forms.
• Spells common vocabulary
items correctly; very few (one or
two) occasional spelling
mistakes may be present.
• May occasionally misspell less
common lexical items.
• Errors in word choice and/or
spelling do not distort meaning.
• Writes simple and compound
sentence forms correctly and
demonstrates variety in length
and complexity.
• Uses complex sentences
accurately, including
punctuation.
• Rare errors in grammar and/or
punctuation.
5
• All content is relevant to the
task; insignificant content
omissions may be present.
• The register on the whole
corresponds to the requirements
of the task; occasional and
inconsistent misuse of register
may be present.
• Most content points are
addressed, but their development
• Uses a range of basic
connectors accurately and
attempts to use more advanced
connectors, but not always
accurately, and referencing, but
not always clearly or
appropriately.
• Uses paragraphs to separate
ideas; most paragraphs revolve
around one idea or a set of like
• Uses a range of everyday
vocabulary appropriately; uses
less common lexical items, but
may make frequent errors.
• Has good control of word
formation; may make errors in
producing less common word
forms.
• Spells common vocabulary
items correctly; few (no more
• Writes simple and compound
sentence forms correctly, but
does not demonstrate variety in
length.
• Occasional errors in grammar
and/or punctuation do not distort
meaning.
55
may be slightly imbalanced. ideas; the size of each
paragraph may reflect
imbalanced development of
ideas.
• The format is appropriate.
than five) occasional spelling
mistakes may be present.
• May often misspell less
common lexical items.
• Errors in word choice and/or
spelling do not distort meaning.
4
• Most content is relevant to the
task; insignificant content
omissions may be present.
• The register on the whole
corresponds to the requirements
of the task.
• Most content points are
addressed, but some content
points may be more fully
covered than others.
• Uses a range of basic
connectors accurately.
• Uses paragraphs to separate
ideas, but tends to misuse
paragraphing (a script is a set
of very short paragraphs or
some paragraphs may be much
longer than other ones for no
apparent reason).
• The format is generally
appropriate.
• Uses everyday vocabulary
generally appropriately, while
occasionally overusing certain
lexical items.
• Has good control of word
formation; can produce common
word forms correctly.
• May make infrequent errors in
spelling more difficult words.
• Errors in word choice and/or
spelling rarely distort meaning.
• Writes simple and some
compound sentence forms
correctly.
• While errors in grammar and/or
punctuation are noticeable,
meaning is rarely distorted.
3
• Some content is relevant to the
task; significant content
omissions may be present.
• The register barely corresponds
to the requirements of the task.
• Only some content points,
which are minimally addressed.
• Uses some basic connectors,
but these may be inaccurate or
repetitive.
• Writes in paragraphs, but may
not use them to separate ideas
(a script may have random
breaks between paragraphs).
• The format may be
inappropriate in places.
• Uses basic vocabulary
reasonably appropriately.
• Has some control of word
formation; can produce some
common word forms correctly.
• Makes frequent errors in
spelling more difficult words,
but simple words are spelled
correctly.
• Errors in word choice and/or
spelling distort meaning at
times.
• Writes simple sentence forms
mostly correctly.
• Errors in grammar and/or
punctuation may distort meaning
at times.
56
2
• Severe irrelevances and
misinterpretations of the task
may be present.
• Only few content points, which
are minimally addressed.
• May use a very limited range
of basic cohesive devices, and
those used may not indicate a
logical relationship between
ideas.
• Attempts to write in
paragraphs, but their use may
be confusing (may start every
sentence with a new line).
• The format may be
inappropriate.
• Uses an extremely limited
range of vocabulary.
• Has very limited control of
word formation; can produce a
few common word forms
correctly.
• Makes many errors in spelling,
including a range of simple
words.
• Errors in word choice and/or
spelling distort meaning.
• Writes some simple sentence
forms correctly.
• Frequent errors in grammar and/
or punctuation distort meaning.
1
• Attempts the task, but it is
largely misinterpreted and the
response is barely relevant to the
task.
• Links are missing or
incorrect.
• Does not write in paragraphs
at all (a script is a block of
text).
• The format is not appropriate.
• Can only use a few isolated
words and/or memorised
phrases.
• Has essentially no control of
word formation; can barely
produce any word forms.
• Displays few examples of
conventional spelling.
• No evidence of sentence forms.
0
• Does not attempt the task in any way.
OR
• The response is completely irrelevant to the task.
OR
• There is too little language to assess.
OR
• Content is completely incomprehensible due to extremely poor handwriting: very few words are distinguishable, so there is a lack of
context to verify meaning.
57
CRITERIA FOR MARKING SPEAKING
Give a mark out of 6 for each criterion (development, fluency, and language) and then calculate a mean to give an overall total out of 6.
Mark /
Criterion
Development and Fluency Language
6
• Produces stretches of language in a register which is
appropriate to the situation provided in the task and may opt to
vary register to enhance meaning.
• Shows sustained ability to maintain a conversation and to make
relevant contributions at some length.
• Produces extended stretches of language despite some
hesitation.
• Can respond to change in direction of the conversation.
• Pronunciation is intelligible.
• Intonation is appropriate.
• Produces error-free simple sentences.
• Uses complex grammatical forms, but may make errors, which rarely
cause comprehension problems.
• Uses a range of appropriate vocabulary to give and exchange views
on a growing range of general and curricular topics.
5
• Produces stretches of language in a register which is
appropriate to the situation provided in the task.
• Responds relevantly and at length which makes frequent
prompting unnecessary, resulting in a competent conversation.
• Produces mostly extended stretches of language despite some
hesitation, although instances of using short phrases may be
present.
• Can generally respond to change in direction of the
conversation.
• Pronunciation is generally intelligible.
• Intonation is generally appropriate.
• Produces error-free simple sentences.
• Uses a range of appropriate vocabulary when talking about a range
of general and curricular topics.
• Occasional mistakes do not cause comprehension problems.
4
• Produces stretches of language in a register which is generally
appropriate to the situation provided in the task.
• Attempts to respond to questions and prompts.
• Produces responses which are extended beyond short phrases,
despite hesitation.
• Effort will need to be made to develop the conversation; only
partial success will be achieved.
• Pronunciation is mostly intelligible.
• May not follow English intonation patterns at times.
• Frequently produces error-free simple sentences.
• Uses appropriate vocabulary to talk about a limited range of general
and curricular topics.
• Errors may cause comprehension problems.
58
3
• Produces stretches of language without awareness of register.
• Responses tend to be brief and are characterised by frequent,
hesitation.
• Has to be encouraged to go beyond short responses and
struggles to develop a conversation.
• There is a lack of intelligibility of pronunciation, but it is
unlikely to impede communication.
• May not follow English intonation patterns frequently.
• Produces basic sentence forms and some correct simple sentences.
• Uses a limited range of appropriate vocabulary to talk about a
limited range of general topics.
• Errors are frequent and may lead to misunderstanding.
2
• Responses are so brief that little is communicated.
• Barely engages in a conversation.
• Pronunciation may cause some communication difficulty.
• Does not follow English intonation patterns.
• Attempts basic sentence forms, but with limited success.
OR
• Heavily relies on apparently memorised utterances.
• Uses a limited range of appropriate vocabulary to talk about a very
limited range of general topics.
• Makes numerous errors except in memorised expressions.
1
• No communication possible.
• Pronunciation and intonation patterns cause difficulty for even
the most sympathetic listener.
• Cannot produce basic sentence forms.
• Can only produce isolated words and phrases or memorised
utterances.
0
• No attempt at the response.
OR
• No rateable language.
59
Transcript
Presenter: Good afternoon and welcome to 'Book Corner'. Our first review today is of an unusual
book by Charles Foster which is a combination of nature writing, biology, philosophy,
personal memoir … it’s not very definable, but it’s already being described as a modern
classic. Jon, tell us about the book you’ve been reading.
Jon: You’re quite right, it’s not very easy to define. The title is Being a Beast and the book is
about the author’s attempts to be a beast, that is, to live as an animal, or rather as several
animals: a badger, an otter, a fox, a red deer and a bird. He says he wanted to really know
what life was like for these animals and so he did the conventional research, the reading
and so on. Then he actually tried to live in the same way as them, as far as possible. For
example, when he’s being a badger, he goes to live in a hole in the ground and crawls
around a wood, learning to identify different trees by their smell. He even experiments
with eating earthworms. Eighty-five per cent of a badger’s diet is made up of earthworms
– did you know that?
Presenter: Ugh! I didn’t know that. He took one of his children with him, didn’t he?
Jon: Yes, his eight-year-old son, Tom. Foster says that children make better animals than
adults in many ways – they use their senses to understand the world more, and they think
in a much less abstract way than adults. Another reason why he took his son is that
badgers are social creatures and would never live alone. He says that Tom adapted
quickly to being a badger, learning to smell mice, hear tiny forest sounds and get around
on four feet.
Presenter: How did Foster tackle being the other animals?
Jon: In the same kind of way. As an otter, he spent a lot of time in the rivers and lakes and the
sea, as an otter would – alone this time, since otters are solitary. The otter’s big problem
is that it has to spend all its time hunting for food in order to survive, and that feeling of
desperation was hard to recreate, but he did catch live fish in his mouth.

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